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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings heretics!

I've reached the point in my hobby life (going on 2 years now since I bought my first miniature, so I suppose it fits) where I'm considering buying an airbrush. However, it is not to replace the brushes, but rather for these particular effects:

- Lightning effects (Plasma guns, eyes, etc).
- Priming in odd colors.
- Painting large surfaces such as vehicles.

My questions are now two-fold for all of you airbrushers out there:

1) When considering such specific assignments for it, would you say the time is right to buy an airbrush?

2) If yes, I would greatly appreciate any recommendations as to brand and model I should consider.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Greetings heretics!

I've reached the point in my hobby life (going on 2 years now since I bought my first miniature, so I suppose it fits) where I'm considering buying an airbrush. However, it is not to replace the brushes, but rather for these particular effects:

- Lightning effects (Plasma guns, eyes, etc).
- Priming in odd colors.
- Painting large surfaces such as vehicles.

My questions are now two-fold for all of you airbrushers out there:

1) When considering such specific assignments for it, would you say the time is right to buy an airbrush?

2) If yes, I would greatly appreciate any recommendations as to brand and model I should consider.

Thanks in advance!
this is too much and open ended question..
a: the time is right when you feel you want to do it
b: all depends on your budget...i would highly recommend the iwata neo for the first brush..there are lots of reviews on youtube on it..its a great brush..but heres the trap..DONT skimp on the compressor..spend the money and get something descent.
 

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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
this is too much and open ended question..
a: the time is right when you feel you want to do it
b: all depends on your budget...i would highly recommend the iwata neo for the first brush..there are lots of reviews on youtube on it..its a great brush..but heres the trap..DONT skimp on the compressor..spend the money and get something descent.
All right, fair point. I guess I was wondering if these little projects was worth the investment and when other people started using a airbrush. A baseline of sorts of when it's the right time to go from thought to investment.

I will keep to the straight questions then :)

Let's say I have around 250 euroes for a project like this, as a max for everything included. I want a airbrush that is good to start with, but also something that can be used once I get to a higher level. A entry-level and medium-level airbrush.
 

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well as i said the neo runs about 60ish euro i think..and then that would leave you the rest ro a compressor..keep in mind sometimes its cheaper NOT to buy a compressor from a model shop..
look around for compressor shops you can generaly pick up one bigger and cheaper.
just get a regulator put on it and bobs your unlce..
avoid a pistion compressor..they are noisy and tend to bounce..and over heat..
im no wizard but try to get one with a reserve tank on it..
 

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I shall answer your question with another question... when is it NOT a right time to buy an airbrush?
 

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Hi Nord, as to when the best time to buy an airbrush is...as soon as you can afford a decent compressor I would say. If you just want to practice there are any number of cheap airbrushes (I personally have a Badger 200 single action and an unbranded dual action - both cheap airbrushes, but I have a Revell Master Class compressor).

The compressor is important though...don't get a cheap one as it will cause you issues with things like overheating, poor and inconsistent air flow, small or no storage tank and oil or water in the line (although you should have an in-line water trap on each airbrush anyway).

I actually went the little extra and fitted quick release connectors so its easy to disconnect one airbrush and connect another (if you use more than one).

At the moment if you only have 250 Euro's that will probably get you the compressor - the Revell cost me £200 last year and is still being sold at Wonderland Models (UK) for that price. On Amazon the same compressor is going for £300.

I think your best bet would be to save a bit more before you buy, or do like me and just buy bits as you can afford them as it' not just the compressor and airbrush you need to think about.

You will also need cleaning tools, cleaning fluid (I use Muc-Off bike cleaner :)), in-line water trap, hoses, spare paint bottles (depending on your airbrush and painting habits) etc, etc.

Cheers

Cy
 

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Greetings heretics!

I've reached the point in my hobby life (going on 2 years now since I bought my first miniature, so I suppose it fits) where I'm considering buying an airbrush. However, it is not to replace the brushes, but rather for these particular effects:

- Lightning effects (Plasma guns, eyes, etc).
- Priming in odd colors.
- Painting large surfaces such as vehicles.

My questions are now two-fold for all of you airbrushers out there:

1) When considering such specific assignments for it, would you say the time is right to buy an airbrush?

2) If yes, I would greatly appreciate any recommendations as to brand and model I should consider.

Thanks in advance!
ANSWERS


1. The best time to buy an airbrush is when you want to expand your painting capability and are willing to put time and effort into learning how to paint with one.

2. The two best brands that I would recommend are Badger and Iwata.
 

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Save and hunt. Keep your eyes open for what you want (hunt) and save until you find a deal that fits your needs. As said by everyone above, do NOT skimp on the compressor. I did, and paid the price for it (literally). Wasn't too mad about it, got a lot of practice in, but it was quickly noticed that the no tank was a massive drawback.
Another thing to be aware of and think about: noise. Because I live in an apartment, I needed a compressor that wasn't going to wake up my neighbors at 3am when I was on a painting binge.
As for the actual airbrush itself, will tell you what I feel is the way to go. It may be different for other people. Dual action, gravity fed are my two musts. The only brushes I've used are Iwata (CS and BS I think off hand), and a cheap badger that was single action. The badger was "ok" for practice, but I couldn't do with it what I wanted to do.
 

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I'm in the market for an airbrush myself and honestly I've been wanting one since ive found about their magic about half a year ago I was about to get one before I realised what a time and money investment it is!

Right now I am planning to get a no brand dual action gravity fed airbrush and a decent compressor and just like Cypher up there said its not only this 2 things, you need to get bunch of other stuff aswell.
So I am just bidding my time right now until I have enough money to invest in it. Also I wanted to learn how to actually paint decals with it and pimp my motorbike with some sick flames and skulls =3
 

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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I've decided it's time to take the leap; Early next year I will be getting an airbrush, for light effects and glow effects, along with painting vehicles.

I have settled on the Badger Air-Brush Co 105 Patriot as my first brush, and I'm currently exploring which compressors to buy.

I'm comfortable with my brushes, so this is totally uncharted territory for me. I will only be doing it for effects though, but I want to get more lighting effects on my models and get that haunted look. This should suit my needs and help me get a few better effects overall.

Now I'm both eager and scared shitless at the same time!
 

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The right time is now. :D Do it already! Buy an airbrush!

In all seriousness, the time is when you can add a brush, compressor, spares, cleaning products and like £50 worth of paints to your basket and click the "Pay Now" button with some confidence. Do you really enjoy painting enough that you think this is going to be worth the £300+ cost? Are you going to be able to learn new techniques and the muscle memory and hand-eye co-ordination required (it's a different ball game with an airbrush).

I am also slightly contratian to Cypher's view of the compressor. :) Whilst a £200+ compressor is going to be fantastic and make things far more enjoyable, that sort of cost is unrealistic when you're just starting out. Maybe this christmas you get a nice airbrush and an okay compressor and next christmas you treat yourself to a great compressor. My £60 compressor (with a tank, may I add) is loud, vibrates in the non-fun way and overheats... But it's not like a turn it on and have to hide behind a blast door for fear of it exploding whilst I send in some specialists to douse it with liquid nitrogen to counter-act the heat coming from it like some episode of Stargate SG-1; it gets hot after about half an hour of use, sure, but it won't get hot enough to nope out for at least an hour and a half of use, more than enough for me most of the time and I plan accordingly.

SOMETHING TO KEEP IN MIND (which may have been mentioned already in this thread):

An airbrush is not a REPLACEMENT for a regular brush. It's just another tool in your arsenal. It's a major tool, sure, but at the end of the day the king of the hill is the good ol' fashioned paint brush. That being said, you can do huge amounts of the work using just the airbrush. I don't do many extreme highlights anymore favouring multi-stage lighting effects with the airbrush (This might be what zenithal lighting is? I don't know, that word I've seen mostly used to reference flat panels) which include a top highlight without making a line on the top most edge (I think it's often overkill and can spoil the look*, especially with my brush control). I feel I've gone off on a bit of a tangent now, so allow me to shut up. :)

* - an example of this, which is HIGHLY OPINIONATED AND NOT GOSPEL TRUTH, is Awaken Realms' Tau XV 109 . Before I say anything else, I do believe this is an absolutely stunning piece of work and well worth the money someone paid for it (which I won't even begin to think about; big numbers following a currency symbol scare me). However, the extreme highlights here are not to my personal liking and I would have preferred the piece without them, or at least with them toned done quite a bit; most of the highlighting effects are provided without these and are more than sufficient to my eyes.
 

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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
SOMETHING TO KEEP IN MIND (which may have been mentioned already in this thread):

An airbrush is not a REPLACEMENT for a regular brush. It's just another tool in your arsenal. It's a major tool, sure, but at the end of the day the king of the hill is the good ol' fashioned paint brush. That being said, you can do huge amounts of the work using just the airbrush. I don't do many extreme highlights anymore favouring multi-stage lighting effects with the airbrush (This might be what zenithal lighting is? I don't know, that word I've seen mostly used to reference flat panels) which include a top highlight without making a line on the top most edge (I think it's often overkill and can spoil the look*, especially with my brush control). I feel I've gone off on a bit of a tangent now, so allow me to shut up.
Oh don't you worry - I will always prefer the brush.

However, I want something to achieve a better lighting and gradient effect. Especially on things that glow and have a eerie look to it, I like the look better when done with a airbrush.

Vehicles as well, and basing my models will be easier. I will still do 80-85% of the work I do by brush, but having these choices would give me a new challenge and a overall greater result in my opinion.
 

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Oh don't you worry - I will always prefer the brush.

However, I want something to achieve a better lighting and gradient effect. Especially on things that glow and have a eerie look to it, I like the look better when done with a airbrush.

Vehicles as well, and basing my models will be easier. I will still do 80-85% of the work I do by brush, but having these choices would give me a new challenge and a overall greater result in my opinion.
Honestly, in the long run, entry level airbrush + compressor will save you money on basecoating alone.

You'll save about £6 per can you go through (Assuming 1 bottle = 1 can). Some people can go through a can a month, easily. Well that's £72 a year!
 

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Revell Master Class compresssor
@Cypher871 - how noisy is this compressor? I have a great airbrush (Harder and Steenbeck Evolution) but it doesn't get any use as most of my painting is done in the front room where my wife is watching TV and my current compressor (cheap one without a tank!) is too noisy!

So I'm on the look out for a small, quiet replacement.

Nord - definitely get a good compressor first as a bad one will just frustrate you and out you off airbrushing. At least thats my experience!
 

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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
....I have a Revell Master Class compressor....

....the Revell cost me £200 last year and is still being sold at Wonderland Models (UK) for that price. On Amazon the same compressor is going for £300.
Cy
I ended up buying the Revell Master Class. Thanks a lot for the tip!

A little side-note to those who haven't bought it yet: If you're in Europe, you can get it on the german Amazon for roughly 200 euros, equivalent of about £150. It's about half price from the manufacturer!

http://www.amazon.de/Revell-Airbrush-39138-Kompressor-master/dp/B000FCOK36/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1420027095&sr=8-1&keywords=revell+master+class

Now I just have to wait for everything to come home :D
 
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