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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

I'm new at painting (painted some models a few years ago, and recently got back into it).

I have a real problem trying to layer my models.

At the moment I'm following a straight-forward tutorial for my plaguebearers. I've primed them and based them green. But when I want to layer on the next colour, it just comes out really ugly.

Here is my plaguebearer: Primed, based with Deathworld Forest and then washed with Biel-Tan Green.

So far so good, in that it just looks like a work in progress.


After that I try to layer on with Nurgling Green, and this is the result



It just looks pretty awful.
What ends up happening I feel is that the paint feels too thin. (First image). I try to layer it on, but it just doesn't stick well and is pretty runny. If I try to compensate by adding more colour to the mix (second image) it just gets painfully obvious where the line is between the base colour and the layering.

Any tips on what I can do is greatly appreciated. I'm guessing the answer lies in blending, but from the tutorial (it skips some parts, but from what I can tell) there is no kind of wet blending involved. They just paint on the colour and it just looks like it automatically blends in the edges. My own attempts at blending just leaves a strong colour in the middle and a weak colour at the edges where brush strokes are clearly visible.

I'm using a mix of colour, water and glaze medium like the tutorial suggested. (But probably in wrong proportions, although I somewhat doubt it would improve the result drastically anway)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply :)

The layer before the wast sounds pretty good actually, although I guess the price would be a darker end-result?

Do you think this is an issue with my brush technique, or simply a result of trying to layer colours that are too different from the base?
 

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Thanks for the reply :)

The layer before the wast sounds pretty good actually, although I guess the price would be a darker end-result?

Do you think this is an issue with my brush technique, or simply a result of trying to layer colours that are too different from the base?

You can always highlight back up after washing. I think the later.
 

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It looks like the wash is slightly drowning the model. You might get a better result with multiple thinner layers so it builds up in the crevices without flooding or leaving a hard edge.

As Moriouce says, some intermediate layers would make transitions smoother.

A quick glaze might draw things together too.


I suggest:
Layer with a little darker green over the entire model
Layer over most areas
Layer with a little white to highlight
Wash to add shadow
Glaze with a thinned down coat of layer to unify the layers
 

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Great Unclean One
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What they said; plus, I practice layering/blending on lengths of sprue to check what colours work in a progression from first to last coat. Most times I tend not to apply washes between stages of a blend, because that alters the colour upon which you're adding the next stage, but there are times I will - e.g. my skin colour scheme, which goes as follows:

Bugman's Glow basecoat
Wash of Baal Red in places, with Leviathan Purple in deepest recesses
Bugman's Glow
Cadian Fleshtone
Kislev Flesh
Final highlight for faces - 50/50 mix of Kislev Flesh/Ulthuan Grey
Small spots of Tamiya Clear Red for blood effects, Clear Yellow for pus

Looks like this:



I tested and practiced it on bits of sprue, and only applied it to models when I was happy that the colours and washes actually worked together.


_____
 

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Herald of The Warp
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All the tips here are excellent advice - The only thing I would add is that the first layer, in your examples, actually aren't bad. It's very transparent, but if you give it 1-2 layers more in certain areas, the transitions will be quite good.

A good layering is all about the transition from one color to the next; A good transition usually requires multiple layers. It's all up to the painter, but I would recommend that you keep the thin version and do multiple layers.

One question though; Are you thinning down with water or medium? If you use water, it can give a more runny result that makes the paint run into the crevises whereas medium have it act more like a thin paint instead. If you're using water I would heavily recommend that you use Lahmian Medium (GW brand) instead and do a 1:1 mix of medium and your choice layer color - It will give it a good runny consistance but enough to cover everything in one layer.

I hope it helps :good:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for all the great replies!

Instead of using only Nurgling Green I blended it 1:1 with the Death World Forest.
Moriouce made a very good point about the Biel-Tan Green actually altering the hue of the colours, so next time I'll wash at the later stages instead.

Image:
Left: based and washed (before layering) Right: after layering with the 1:1 mix.


I think the 1:1 mix did a much better job.

Dave T Hobbit said:
Glaze with a thinned down coat of layer to unify the layers
So in this case something like a 10:1 mix of glaze medium and my layer colour (which in this case is a 1:1 mix of two colours, so 10: (1:1)?

Nordicus said:
The only thing I would add is that the first layer, in your examples, actually aren't bad. It's very transparent, but if you give it 1-2 layers more in certain areas, the transitions will be quite good.
That would combat the visible strokes I reckon, but it feels like I either have to paint further "in" from the edges, and leave the transparent strokey edge looking bad, or paint right along the edge and end up with the really sharp layer edge. Am I approaching it wrong thinking like that?

Nordicus said:
Are you thinning down with water or medium?
I used both the first time, because the tutorial did it that way. But after what you said I tried to only use glaze medium (is that the medium you meant?) and it actually went better.
Or rather, it started pretty runny but after a short break it had a pretty good concistency upon my return. It was easier to get that natural edge-blending with the medium.
 

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That would combat the visible strokes I reckon, but it feels like I either have to paint further "in" from the edges, and leave the transparent strokey edge looking bad, or paint right along the edge and end up with the really sharp layer edge. Am I approaching it wrong thinking like that?
Hmm not quite, and yet. The way I do it, which is all I can give as tips really, is that I have a quite thin mix, and then I do a quite far reaching layer. When it dries I go a little further in, leaving some of the edges to only the first layer. And I keep it going like that, going a little bit further in every time, to get those nice transitions.

In the end, it's something that requires practice with thinner paints and how to work them. But once you master it, there is nothing you cannot do in terms of effects. It's all about practice and patience really :)

I used both the first time, because the tutorial did it that way. But after what you said I tried to only use glaze medium (is that the medium you meant?) and it actually went better.
Or rather, it started pretty runny but after a short break it had a pretty good concistency upon my return. It was easier to get that natural edge-blending with the medium.
Glaze medium can be used aye. Personally I alternate between GWs "Lahmian Medium" and Vallejos "Matt medium" depending on which brand I use for that color. I find that the brands own medium works a bit better with their own paints, so I have both at hand.

Whether it be glaze or matt is all up to the look you want. I use matt, as I usually paint daemon skin or Chaos power armor - None of them are that shiny really :D
 
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