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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The first Chaplin is a commission piece I am doing for a friend. He plays Space Wolves, but wanted to keep the black armor scheme of the Codex Chaplin for his Rune Priest. So, to add a personal touch to the model, I painted the jump pack in the concrete grey to match his army.




This next Chaplin is one of my own. The Chapter he belongs to is home brewed, Chaos Requiem, or "the Death Song Marines." Chaos Requiem works very closely with the Order of the Servant Flame, my home brewed Battle Sisters convent. While the Sisters have orange armor with a black left pauldron, my Marines have black armor with an orange left pauldron. You can't see the left shoulder very well in the second picture, cause I haven't finished the writing for the scroll work yet. :biggrin:


 

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Very nice. That assault chaplain is one of my favorite models in the line. You did very solid work on both chaplains, but I think you need to do some hightlights. The problem with black armor is that unless you do highlights it simply looks like a WIP of a black primed model.
Your chapter chaplain's face looks good, i like the yellow eye. But I think his steel plate needs lite wash of anything so it doesn't look so shinny. Also his right shoulder pad looks unfinished. It looks like a first coat cause you can still see some of the black peaking from beneath. I suggest you paint is a solid coat of whatever yellow you're using then give it a devlan mud wash, and once dry highlight/drybrush with the original yellow to make it stand out.
Last thing, since the models are metal you will want to give them several THIN coats of primer instead of one or two normal coat like you would on a plastic model. I can see edges and spots where the primer has rubbed off and the metal is showing through. The metal models seem to have more chemical release agent than the plastic models, so you'll want to make sure they're clean before you prime them. Make sure you wash your metal models in soapy water and rinse thoroughly with tepid water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice. I know you're supposed to wash resin models, never knew about the same for pewter. After seeing the models blown up on my screen I started noticing the few parts where paint rubbed off, hard to tell sometimes on the actual model. I'll do those few minor touch ups and post new pictures.
 

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Yeah. Resin are specially bad, but all molds (metal, resin or plastic) get sprayed with a release agent. Usually there's no problem at all, but I've noticed that the metal models either get sprayed more or retain the release more than the plastic sprues. Seeing your models blown up about 10X or 20X really helps point out your problem areas. For special characters I usually take a pic and inspected before I finish up with them. You'll notice a lot of things you've missed that you would have otherwise never seen.
All you gotta do now is base those bad boys and you're all done. The only thing that kills a good model more than no basing is mold line.
 
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