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Making Vidya Games
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So to clear things up first, when I mean natural phenomenon, im talking about the works and gadgets of the physical universe.

As far as we know, mankind has discovered some amazing while terrorfying things about the galaxy. For example GRB 080319B, the farthest visable gamma ray burst know to man (as of now) was recorded on March 19, 2008. To put it in a short sense, a gamma ray burst if a huge ass explosion of energy and light (visibility wise), and this one could be seen from 7.5 gigalight years (aka really fucking far). Though this occured 7.5 billion years ago, this type of explosion would have destroyed a galaxy easily.

So this brings into my main question: in the time of approximently of 38,000 years, have such things like GRB, black holes, super novas and other galatic events effected the universe of WH40K?
 

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first off I applaud your use of "fuck" with the "7.5 gigalight years (AKA really fucking far)" that made me smile

and now for your question

seeing as they have said that C'Tan and Chaos Gods devour planets and make them explode I think that they are just giving another excuse of why the phenomenons are happening
 

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Making Vidya Games
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gracias.

Continuing on the subject, sure the chaos gods and the c'tan can make planets explode, but stuff like this can basicly rape galaxys. I do not doubt the powers of chaos and how strong they are, as along with the c'tan, but Im talking about the forces of "cosmic" (a hippie scientific term) energy here. You know, the stuff that made the c'tan.

But have any such events actually effected the physical galaxy?
 

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I would say no. In the galactic sense 40,000 years is not long. So I would imagine that the galaxy/universe isn't much different from it is today. We may have more advanced technology to observe such things, but overall things are ship shape.
 

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Well, our planet is only a small fragment of the big picture. Most of the images from the other edges of our galaxy are only just now reaching us after millions if not trillions (yes, I skipped billions. I could say vigintillions, but that's 24 zeros, and I doubt we've been around that long) of years travelling to us. The nearest star system, I seem to recall was several thousand light years. Imagine, if we're seeing the galaxy, and the stars appear so bright now, I'd figure they'd have aged quite a bit by now.

Anyone watch Stargate Atlantis? There's two episodes regarding the sun of their system growing to a red giant. In one, it's 40,000 years into the future.

Seeing as our own sun is set to grow to that size in about 50,000 years, don't you think Holy Terra might have gone dry by solar flare power by now?

Food for thought, anyways.
 

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Seeing as our own sun is set to grow to that size in about 50,000 years, don't you think Holy Terra might have gone dry by solar flare power by now?

Food for thought, anyways.
perhaps 50000 years is enough time to somehow develop technology that enables the survival of said solar flares?
 

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Well, our planet is only a small fragment of the big picture. Most of the images from the other edges of our galaxy are only just now reaching us after millions if not trillions (yes, I skipped billions. I could say vigintillions, but that's 24 zeros, and I doubt we've been around that long) of years travelling to us. The nearest star system, I seem to recall was several thousand light years. Imagine, if we're seeing the galaxy, and the stars appear so bright now, I'd figure they'd have aged quite a bit by now.

Anyone watch Stargate Atlantis? There's two episodes regarding the sun of their system growing to a red giant. In one, it's 40,000 years into the future.

Seeing as our own sun is set to grow to that size in about 50,000 years, don't you think Holy Terra might have gone dry by solar flare power by now?

Food for thought, anyways.
You seem quite knowledgable, but I thought we had far longer than 50k before the sun goes nova? Where did you get that info?

I assumed the sun of New Atlantis was just really old to begin with.


OP: I have read about these things, man they`re fucking scary. To know we could be obliterated so easily with barely any warning, and no hope for survival?

Putting this in the terms of 40k, I would imagine this to be beyond even the gods powers, c`tan or chaos.

Unless they are what causes it? As far as I know, no such occurence or similar has affected the 40k galaxy ever before, but the war in heaven remains largely unexplained.
 

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Serpion5: I'm not knowledgeable. I was just trying to remember things from high school and forgot to check the facts against current sources. www.universetoday.com says the sun won't get to be a red giant for billions of years. If you don't like their site, perhaps you can read this Question/Answer by NASA, conspiracy theoriests beware, the link takes you to a US government site! :p.

Still, I figure, if we're talking about 40k, where c'tan feed off of stars, and various races (or armies: Chaos) have weapons capable of destroying stars (and considering these armies are not at the pinnacle of their technology, we can safely assume these weapons were designed before the Emperor rose to power)... I somehow question whether earth would be unaffected by at least one major cataclysm on the scale of a star exploding.

As to 13illfred: Sure, we could develop the tech to protect against solar flares. Void shields do that, to some extent. But that's dependent on us not devolving back into a stone age from the EMP such a flare would generate (which could short a void shield, I think)

Now, if you really want a mind-f*ck. Imagine Warhammer 40k if the movie Pulse came true now.
 

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Our sun has billions of years left in its life cycle. By the time it is in the "Red Giant" state it will be hundreds of times bigger, have swallowed Mercury and burnt Venus and Earth to a crisp. If that happens Terra doesn't stand a chance. If the closest star to Terra suddenly went nova, it would take 5 years for the debris to reach Terra if it was traveling at the speed of light, which it can not. Lets assume the debris can travel at a quarter the speed of light. It would take 20 years to reach Terra. As the wall of rock, gas and energy travels through space it grows thinner and thinner as it gets wider. By the time 20 years have passed, it might be less forceful, the amount of matter hitting Terra might be within a void shield capability to withstand. So who knows :) But we would have plenty of warning I think.

Images from across the galaxy do not take billions of years to get to us, only many thousand :). Images from the deepest part of the Universe take billions/trillions.
 

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Making Vidya Games
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Images from across the galaxy do not take billions of years to get to us, only many thousand :). Images from the deepest part of the Universe take billions/trillions.
I am only talking about the one instance that NASA caught on camera. GRB 080319B is the farthest away from us that we have caught on camera. Its estimated distance is 7.5 billion light years away. To see something that far away with some visability gives it credit to be one of the most awesome explosions that mother nature sharted out for us.

"The GRB's redshift was measured to be 0.937[5], which means that the explosion occurred about 7.5 billion (7.5×109) years ago*" this shows how old it is and how long it took.

*Here is the link of the info about the quote http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/7444.gcn3
 

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I know. Belthazor had stated that light within our galaxy takes billions of years to reach us. The milky way is roughly 100,000 light years across. So light wont take a billion years to reach us from any point in the galaxy. I was stating that the light that takes billions of years to reach us is from the furthest reaches of the universe, not galaxy.
 

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AThough this occured 7.5 billion years ago, this type of explosion would have destroyed a galaxy easily.
This may not be true. Just because the light from an explosion can be seen from far away does not mean the explosion was insanely powerful. Once light it created it exists until it it destroyed(absorbed), so it just shoots out and continues on its way.

A small candle can be seen miles away in pitch dark given enough time. Does this mean it is a roaring inferno? No. That's just how light works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This may not be true. Just because the light from an explosion can be seen from far away does not mean the explosion was insanely powerful. Once light it created it exists until it it destroyed(absorbed), so it just shoots out and continues on its way.

A small candle can be seen miles away in pitch dark given enough time. Does this mean it is a roaring inferno? No. That's just how light works.
True, but yet again, this is light. Supernovas, for example, unleash tremendous amounts of energy upon self destruction. That is energy, not light. Kinda two different things. Im talking about the energy part, light can still tag along with it though.
 

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Gauntsghosts: If the nearest star to us went Nova/Supernova, it's not the debris we would have to worry about, but the radiation. This would travel at (or about, depending on wether spacetime is smooth or 'bumpy') the speed of light and could shred us through our atmosphere.
As for light being seen at a long distance, come on, mate, just think for a second. Take your candle, how far away can you see it in the dark? Then how far away can you see it if you make it bigger? These aren't the only factors, though; there's a hell of a lot of dust between us and anything at the edge, or even close to the edge, of the galaxy. For any light AT ALL to reach us from there, let aone light we can tell comes from a particular point of origin, it must have been absolutely vast. Unimaginable, really. Possibly imagine ... well, it fails me. How many local stars would need to explode to rival it? Let's just say more than lots.

GFP
 

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Serpion5: I'm not knowledgeable. I was just trying to remember things from high school and forgot to check the facts against current sources. www.universetoday.com says the sun won't get to be a red giant for billions of years. If you don't like their site, perhaps you can read this Question/Answer by NASA, conspiracy theoriests beware, the link takes you to a US government site! :p.

Still, I figure, if we're talking about 40k, where c'tan feed off of stars, and various races (or armies: Chaos) have weapons capable of destroying stars (and considering these armies are not at the pinnacle of their technology, we can safely assume these weapons were designed before the Emperor rose to power)... I somehow question whether earth would be unaffected by at least one major cataclysm on the scale of a star exploding.

As to 13illfred: Sure, we could develop the tech to protect against solar flares. Void shields do that, to some extent. But that's dependent on us not devolving back into a stone age from the EMP such a flare would generate (which could short a void shield, I think)

Now, if you really want a mind-f*ck. Imagine Warhammer 40k if the movie Pulse came true now.
My mistake. I thought I`d found someone else as brainy as me on the topic of cosmology for a moment there. I am aware of the things those kinds of websites put up. Interesting stuff, but I`ve heard most of it before. 4.5 billion years of sunlight I believe we have left.

40k terms? The energy given off by a dying star is beyond any scale we could possibly comprehend. Sure we could write down a few numbers and compare them to other numbers, but the simple fact is this: The only way to survive a star`s death throes is to be nowhere near the fucker when it goes... :p

Or be the Star God who caused it. :grin:

This may not be true. Just because the light from an explosion can be seen from far away does not mean the explosion was insanely powerful. Once light it created it exists until it it destroyed(absorbed), so it just shoots out and continues on its way.

A small candle can be seen miles away in pitch dark given enough time. Does this mean it is a roaring inferno? No. That's just how light works.
It is entirely true. Astronomers have observed evidence of it plenty of times.

And as has been said, the light from such an event is not the danger. It is the radiation that would be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Apparently I didn't make the point I was trying to make. LoL.

So when a star goes supernova it destroys the galaxy it is in?
Well, the damage done can be executed in two ways: the actually explosion, which I exaggerated, would take a good chunk out of the area it is in. The second damage it would probably due, depending on the star type, is the fallback on the energy/mass of the star itself. This in a long term effect could destroy a galaxy, because of the fallback (other wise a extream compression of its mass) it would in the proccess of creating a black hole, aka the vacum cleaner of space itself.

Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
 

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The big explosion that we're all talking about happened, what wasit, 13.7 billion years ago? The structures around it would have been very different, aminly by being less spread out from the initial Big Bang. So, an explosion of that size would, as far as I'm aware (and wrong-ality is my constant companion), there would be more stuff close to it that could be adveresly affected in the next few hundred thousand-millions of years.
So, I suppose we could say that a supernova can destroy a galaxy, depending on if the conditions are right. ThatOtherGuy explains the effects better, I think.

GFP
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The big explosion that we're all talking about happened, what wasit, 13.7 billion years ago? The structures around it would have been very different, aminly by being less spread out from the initial Big Bang. So, an explosion of that size would, as far as I'm aware (and wrong-ality is my constant companion), there would be more stuff close to it that could be adveresly affected in the next few hundred thousand-millions of years.
So, I suppose we could say that a supernova can destroy a galaxy, depending on if the conditions are right. ThatOtherGuy explains the effects better, I think.

GFP
It was actually 7.6-ish billion years ago, but yes, the material back then must be different. So about the supernova, I looked it up, the actually damage a supernova would do in a galaxy is relativly minor... about a 2000 light radius of damage. The thing that would actually punch a hole end to end would be a GRB. This topic though, does require research to get decent data.

Though here is an exceptional supernova that is quiet scary http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2010/04/antimatter-supernova-the-largest-explosion-ever-recorded-----------------weve-recently-seen-the-largest-explosion-ever-recor.html
 
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