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So, I've been away from the WH world for a good eight years or so, but recently started building a Chaos Space Marines army. Things were going well, I've got a simple color scheme I like down, the beautiful (well, horrendous, but still) Daemon Prince of Nurgle model, my first squad of marines, which im almost done painting, and a squad of plague marines. The plan is, finish this by the end of the weekend, then buy the $175 army starter kit and be gaming by month's end.

Hit a minor snafu, turns out my plague marines, wonderful models that they are, refuse to be glued together, even with the superglue GW recommends for gluing together their metal models. Is my glue defective? Am I potentially doing something wrong? I set up two models this afternoon, used twist ties to hold the arms on, and took a five hour nap. When I woke up the glue was still wet for 3 of the arms! They hadn't stuck at all, with the exception of the one arm that did stay on. I've been trying to get these together all day, since I'm 3 models away from not having anything else to paint. If I try gluing them again and it doesn't work I'm beginning to think the urge to throw them out the window will become to strong. Advice? Alternate methods for attachment? Wizards or blacksmiths willing to aid me in my troubles? All are welcome to contribute.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thats what I was thinking, it seems like there is something wrong with the glue. I may take it back to GW tomorrow and see if they have any idea whats going on
 

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I've had a lot of trouble with games workshop super glue - it's just not what you want for gluing metal. I've found that epoxy tends to work a lot better - my whole Fantasy Chaos Daemons army is metal, and GW glue isn't good enough. They need to start selling high quality epoxy IMHO.
 

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I suggest pinning them otherwise the first time they topple over on the table, and their bits come loose ruining your paint job you will wish you did.
 

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I may be a heretic, but I WAY prefer the plastic figs. When working with metal figs I end up at least half of the time gluing my fingers to the fig, or together...but not the metal to metal. Then of course I also tend to get the "dropsies" when working with superglue as well...dropping my finely sculpted figure, coated in superglue on the carpet to become embedded with dog and cat hair (no matter how often I vacuum, it's always there).

Usually I have best luck with the following method:

1. Place a drop on one side of the join. Arm to body etc. Preferably on the side with the indent.

2. Shake off any excess.

3. Attach the two pieces.

4. Blow on the join (your breath has moisture, which helps cure the superglue).

6. Set it on the table or a place where it won't get bumped and walk away for at least a couple hours. (I usually leave it till the next day).

7. Next time you work on the fig (an hour or a day later), place one drop on the join to coat the part already tacked together. Blow off any excess. Leave to dry till the following day.

For best results, drill and pin whenever possible (don't blow off the dust, it makes a great aid to bonding).

Whenever the parts are too hard to hold together, I use a set of "extra hands".

Cheers!
 

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The problem with gluing metal models is that the superglue has nothing to bond to.

In my experience, if you roughen up the joint with sandpaper or just scrape it a bit with a craft knife, the glue sticks much better.

And like elchimpster says, superglue is not at its strongest immediately- i t only works at its best when it is sticky, not fluid
 

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It sounds like you have either too much superglue or some old stuff; I have found it loses it's power over time. My Zap a Gap got to the point where it simply wouldn't hold, as did my Plasti-Zap...old bottles. For plastic I went back to regular plastic model cements.

All I can say is wash the miniature and parts *very* thoroughly, with a toothbrush and dish soap at minimum. I also routinely pin any metal models regardless of need; it just makes them more secure and doesn't really take that much longer.

On the whole, I agree with Elchimpster; plastic rules. His methodology is pretty much the way I do it as well.

Sister Sin
 

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try pinning them it will take you a long time but will work
 

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Try getting hold of some industrial grade superglue, any hardware store should stock it. Ten times better than GW stuff.

Dragonlover
tht stuff is dangerous i accidently glued a wing to my work top and couldnt get it off no matter wat i tried so just be careful when you use tht stuff it also has the tendency to rip half you skin off if you get it on ure fingers or hands very nast
 

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Definitely use regular superglue, you must have had a defective batch. Also pinning is to be highly recommended.
 

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I<snip>
All I can say is wash the miniature and parts *very* thoroughly, with a toothbrush and dish soap at minimum. I also routinely pin any metal models regardless of need; it just makes them more secure and doesn't really take that much longer.
<snip>
Sister Sin
Oh, totally forgot about that!
Washing parts is important! The release solution used to get the parts off the mold is kinda slippery (makes sense...it's to un-stick it from the mold). This also causes problems with glues sticking.

Thanks Sis!
 

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i had the same problem with my ork warboss which has pretty heavy limbs making them hard to stick i just ripped tiny bits of paper in a small circle shape no bigger than the joing and put than in between the glued joints worked wonders :D my little cousen even knocked him on the floor hes still fine :) lol so thats my tip
 

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Metal Epoxy is much better than superglue, but only for large bitz because it is gloppy and not liquidy like superglue. For small areas use Zap-a-gap, but not the accelerator because it makes the joint weaker. And wierd hobby tip: store superglue in the fridge so it doesn't become like jelly rather than the liquid it started off as. :)
 
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