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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I'm working on my newly revamped CSM set, I've hit a bit of a rough spot - I'm hoping to get some inspiration and tips from some of the vast knowledge pool and experience we have here!

I want to achieve a more dirty and weathered steel effect on my metals than I currently have. In essence I want it in the ballpark of the Decimator attached. I have tried multiple combos and techniques but I simply can't get the hue right or the look'n'feel. It always becomes dull and too black in color.

Any tips to get the metallic feel of the Decimator below would be excellent - I really hope some of you just go "Oh that's easy - here's how!". Oh and I don't use a airbrush - It's all by hand.

Thanks a bunch in advance guys :good:

 

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ok here is what you can do..when you mix your paints add agrax earthsade in stead of water to thin the paint.. when it dries it gives the paint as nice faded colour.. then you can further weather it but chipping and adding nulion oil and argax together in the deeper areas..have a look at my stuff
http://www.heresy-online.net/forums/showthread.php?t=146425
also if you want a more weathered look just in my opinion..avoid high edge highlights.
 

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Critique for da CriticGod
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It looks like the technique varies across the model.

The first technique I'm seeing is carefully layered washes of earthshade and nuln oil, likely thinned out or used very sparingly.

The second is careful mixing or layering of metallics such as lead belcher as the main color, with bits of mostly brass mixed in or layered on. In some places there might also be a hint of warplock bronze mixed into the lead belcher.

The other key quality is the careful un-eveness in the application of they tinting metallic colors. Sometimes we see more steel sometimes more brass.
 

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Generally what I do base with boltgun metal, black wash, then thin down vermin brown as a glaze, and do the same with hawk tuquoise and castellan green, they used it in a tutorial in WD for a mounted chaos lord and I have used it ever since I saw it.
 

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What I do for my orks which looks a lot like the decimator you posted is paint on the base colors then wash with earthshade small amounts at first and pose the model so the earthshade pools where you want it too. Let completely dry add to any spots that need a touch up and let completely dry again then go back and highlight areas you want to stand out, the edges or glyphs in a slightly brighter color it will make the weathered part look even more weathered, like the face on the thigh guard of the decimator. Not hard just time consuming waiting for things to dry.
 

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I like doing an oil wash. I use mineral spirits and oil based paint, mix according to the level of colour you want.

Great for age and grimy looks.

Remember to varnish model before. (Depending on look) matt or gloss is ok.

The varnish helps keep the oil wash where you want is and not spreading all over.

Cheers
 

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Herald of The Warp
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like doing an oil wash. I use mineral spirits and oil based paint, mix according to the level of colour you want.

Great for age and grimy looks.

Remember to varnish model before. (Depending on look) matt or gloss is ok.

The varnish helps keep the oil wash where you want is and not spreading all over.

Cheers
I have never dabbled in oil washes before I must admit - What is the difference between these and the standard colors used for miniatures? I'm guessing it gives a more wet look?
 

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