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During the War in Heaven, Aza'Gorod the Nightbringer fought alongside the necrons against the Old Ones and their Eldar allies. The eldar were a psychic race, and they had brought into being powerful gods of warp energy capable of fighting the godly physical energies of the c'tan.

During one of these encounters, the eldar war god Khaine fought the Nightbringer, a duel fought alongside a hundred eldar warriors that kept the necron forces at bay, each wielding a sword forged by the eldar forge god Vaul. All but one, as Vaul ran short on time and substituted a normal mortal blade among the rest. This created a fatal flaw in the eldar lines, one that the necrons were able to exploit and gradually wear the eldar down. Seeing his warriors dying, Khaine struck a vicious blow to his foe, causing the Nightbringer's metal body to rupture and spill the god's essence back to the etheric winds.

It is not known how it did this, but in the moment of its defeat the Nightbringer was able to forever taint Khaine. Who was Khaine before this? Was he perhaps a noble god of battle? Did he become attributed with murder only after his nature was cursed by the Nightbringer's darkness?


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In older lore, when the Nightbringer was forced to sleep, it infused the fear of death within the psyche of every mortal race except the krork. Now known as the orks, they are the only mortal race to not have the fear of death. They will gladly fight and die because that is what they do, they have no fear of it.

We know now that the necrons shattered the Nightbringer into shards alongside its brother c'tan, so can it still be considered responsible for this act? The Flayer virus was imparted to the necrons during the death throes of Llandu'gor the Flayer, so perhaps the Nightbringer's fear of mortality curse was spread to the galaxy's surviving inhabitants in the moments of its sundering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No c'tan is anti psychic. They're just unable to be psychic.

There is reference to the eldar god Asuryan placing the barrier between the Warp and the Materium very late in the war in Heaven. This suggests that at one time the two realms were much easier to cross between. Frankly, the battle could have taken place as the eldar gods would have been able to enter the materium at this point in time.

And when in the materium, warp beings become subject to material law. It is entirely possible that the Nightbringer could have had a permanent effect on his opponent. Especially given the c'tan's shown ability to affect the minds of other creatures. We do not know the exact nature of the eldar gods by comparison, so I wouldn't rule it out.
 

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Could the 'taint' be mental the nightbringer mentally scarred Khain to the point that he went from god of honorable combat and war to a war and blood.

I'd consider all shards as 'tainting' Khain.
 

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No c'tan is anti psychic. They're just unable to be psychic.

There is reference to the eldar god Asuryan placing the barrier between the Warp and the Materium very late in the war in Heaven. This suggests that at one time the two realms were much easier to cross between. Frankly, the battle could have taken place as the eldar gods would have been able to enter the materium at this point in time.
I'm not doubting the battle took place. It is a really cool piece of fluff. I'm just doubting that the death throes of a C'Tan could have such a wide ranging psychic effect of instilling fear of death and that iconic image we have of the grim reaper in all mortals if he had no psychic ability of his own. Besides, Humanity was still a long way off evolving at the time of the War in Heaven.

And when in the materium, warp beings become subject to material law. It is entirely possible that the Nightbringer could have had a permanent effect on his opponent. Especially given the c'tan's shown ability to affect the minds of other creatures. We do not know the exact nature of the eldar gods by comparison, so I wouldn't rule it out.
Khaine could very well have suffered permanent damage fighting a being as powerful as himself. I find it ironic that he would suffer a similar fate as the C'Tan by being broken into shards and spread around the craftworlds.
 

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a psychic imprint that would last Millenia on other races is just a bit of a stretch.
Not millennia, we're talking 60 million+ years. Which is crazy!

What leads me to believe that the 'Nightbringer imprinting fear on all mortal races' tale is a myth, is not because I don't think such a feat is plausible, it's because I don't think it's plausible that mortal races would have evolved without fear. Fear is good, it is an essential component of our psyche.

I think if we don't take it so literally, I could get on board with the Nightbringer imprinting it's essence so that it embodied fear in all mortal races - became the image of and manifestation of fear in mortal races. But to imprint fear itself, has always seemed a bit far-fetched.

And as with all stories of Eldar Mythology, I personally don't think taking them literally is the way to go.

And when in the materium, warp beings become subject to material law.
How do you mean?
 

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Not millennia, we're talking 60 million+ years. Which is crazy!

What leads me to believe that the 'Nightbringer imprinting fear on all mortal races' tale is a myth, is not because I don't think such a feat is plausible, it's because I don't think it's plausible that mortal races would have evolved without fear. Fear is good, it is an essential component of our psyche.

I think if we don't take it so literally, I could get on board with the Nightbringer imprinting it's essence so that it embodied fear in all mortal races - became the image of and manifestation of fear in mortal races. But to imprint fear itself, has always seemed a bit far-fetched.

And as with all stories of Eldar Mythology, I personally don't think taking them literally is the way to go.
As I take it. I don't see it necessarily meaning he imprinted fear of death, but instead became a symbol for fear of death.

Like his visage became death incarnate for the mortal races, the Stereo-typical Reaper. I don't see it as some pyschic imprint but as that he did so many terrible things that no one forgot his "face" so to speak, and so a Scythe wielding cloaked fiend came to represent death for all mortal races except for the Krork.

Baby don't fear the Reaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm not doubting the battle took place. It is a really cool piece of fluff. I'm just doubting that the death throes of a C'Tan could have such a wide ranging psychic effect of instilling fear of death and that iconic image we have of the grim reaper in all mortals if he had no psychic ability of his own. Besides, Humanity was still a long way off evolving at the time of the War in Heaven.
The c'tan do not need psychic abilities to affect the minds of other races. They have their own means.

How do you mean?
A daemon in the warp is formless, a daemon in the materium has a body and can be fought physically. If the eldar gods could cross the barrier at some point, I imagine the same rules would apply.

I am also inclined to take the eldar myths a little more literally for two reasons. The story of the barrier makes little sense otherwise, and 40k is a setting where such things can and do have literal context.
 
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