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Nice concept mate, I'd like to see it taken a bit further with underlying colours beyond the plastic's raw state - seeing bits of ultramarine armour midst the snowdrift, or greeny brown dead foliage, or stone hues to the building.
 

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Thordis
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice concept mate, I'd like to see it taken a bit further with underlying colours beyond the plastic's raw state - seeing bits of ultramarine armour midst the snowdrift, or greeny brown dead foliage, or stone hues to the building.
not quite raw plastic but the grey I used as an underlying colour is almost the same colour grey XD
well I am not quite done experimenting yet so keep your eyes peeled in the scenery&basing section section.
I like the idea of abandoned wargear left in the snow.
 

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Glad to see you are bulding some terrain for your tundra/ice board! I really like the snowswept look of the ruin, and am curious to how you achieved this. Do you use a tub of model snow, or make it yourself?
Do you just dust the piece with white spray paint?

As you ask for tips on how to improve the piece, I think I've got some for you:
First, the ruin looks remakably clean for a destroyed building. The roof and walls that have crumbled have not disintegrated completely, so you could start off with litterling the ground with rubble.
Another thing you could do is pick one direction, and build up snow against all vertical surfaces in that direction. That way, it looks like a small breeze swept across the ruin. A slight gathering of the snow at the base of all vertical surfaces would also suggest not all of the snow stuck, but fell down and gathered at the base.
Though it is probably personal preference, I would bevel the edges of the base to make it blend in with the underlying board more, as well as making it less angular, unless you plan to do an entire ruined city.
I also wouldn't put as much snow on the front door. I think the snow would stick somewhat less to the smooth vertical surface and gather somewhat at the entrace. That way you could also introduce a slight variation in colour on the piece. I can also imagine there being less snow directly beneath the roof, unless it has been quite windy.
I'll be looking forward to your next pieces! Some cold terrain might alleviate the heat of this hot Dutch summer!
 

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Thordis
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Glad to see you are bulding some terrain for your tundra/ice board! I really like the snowswept look of the ruin, and am curious to how you achieved this. Do you use a tub of model snow, or make it yourself?
Do you just dust the piece with white spray paint?

As you ask for tips on how to improve the piece, I think I've got some for you:
First, the ruin looks remakably clean for a destroyed building. The roof and walls that have crumbled have not disintegrated completely, so you could start off with litterling the ground with rubble.
Another thing you could do is pick one direction, and build up snow against all vertical surfaces in that direction. That way, it looks like a small breeze swept across the ruin. A slight gathering of the snow at the base of all vertical surfaces would also suggest not all of the snow stuck, but fell down and gathered at the base.
Though it is probably personal preference, I would bevel the edges of the base to make it blend in with the underlying board more, as well as making it less angular, unless you plan to do an entire ruined city.
I also wouldn't put as much snow on the front door. I think the snow would stick somewhat less to the smooth vertical surface and gather somewhat at the entrace. That way you could also introduce a slight variation in colour on the piece. I can also imagine there being less snow directly beneath the roof, unless it has been quite windy.
I'll be looking forward to your next pieces! Some cold terrain might alleviate the heat of this hot Dutch summer!
thanks for the tips! i like them, and will try to implement them when I can get the materials >.> (yes most snow effects thus far have been achieved with white spray paint from a local DiY)
 

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For my own snow projects I use a mixture of water, woodglue and baking powder. It is perfect to make thick, lumpy or slighty thawing snow. It is quite difficult to find the right mixture but it isn't too expensive. It's at least cheaper than the tubs GW sells. I think PVA-glue would also do the trick instead of wood glue.
 

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Thordis
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For my own snow projects I use a mixture of water, woodglue and baking powder. It is perfect to make thick, lumpy or slighty thawing snow. It is quite difficult to find the right mixture but it isn't too expensive. It's at least cheaper than the tubs GW sells. I think PVA-glue would also do the trick instead of wood glue.
totes going to try that ! thanks :eek:k:
 

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Another thing you could add in are footsteps. Just take a model that you havnt glued to a base yet and "walk" him around.
Looks good to me though!
 

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For my own snow projects I use a mixture of water, woodglue and baking powder. It is perfect to make thick, lumpy or slighty thawing snow. It is quite difficult to find the right mixture but it isn't too expensive. It's at least cheaper than the tubs GW sells. I think PVA-glue would also do the trick instead of wood glue.
You can, but a pro tip with "baking powder" (and the others will just have to excuse some occasional Dutch words in here).

Baking powder as we buy it (bakpoeder) is a mix of what English speakers would call baking soda (natriumbicarbonaat aka maagzout) and some carbohydrates in there. Over the course of many years, that could go a bit yellow-ish because of some of the carbohydrates in there (starch/zetmeel).

So mixing in a smalll amount of white paint into that mix also helps with the becoming yellow over time.





Other than that, as a general feedback: Whilst it's more realistic to represent slight frosting of almost everything on your terrain, it does come at the expense of visual interest... Adding a splotch of colour sometimes might fix that a bit?

Also, I would take a bit of sandpaper, a file or anything like that to round off those hard edges of the board the terrain sits on. :)
 

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Thordis
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You can, but a pro tip with "baking powder" (and the others will just have to excuse some occasional Dutch words in here).

Baking powder as we buy it (bakpoeder) is a mix of what English speakers would call baking soda (natriumbicarbonaat aka maagzout) and some carbohydrates in there. Over the course of many years, that could go a bit yellow-ish because of some of the carbohydrates in there (starch/zetmeel).

So mixing in a smalll amount of white paint into that mix also helps with the becoming yellow over time.





Other than that, as a general feedback: Whilst it's more realistic to represent slight frosting of almost everything on your terrain, it does come at the expense of visual interest... Adding a splotch of colour sometimes might fix that a bit?

Also, I would take a bit of sandpaper, a file or anything like that to round off those hard edges of the board the terrain sits on. :)
more great tips thanks!
also Elmir I think I have seen you on A Dutch Warhammer forum today, is that possible?
 

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Oh very much possible. I'm a member of several boards/forums to help ppl out and to show my own stuff :)
 

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That's a good start at making the floors more interesting. If you don't mind me suggesting improvements, I'd say you could also try to rough up the pieces of rubble on the floor. It's not difficult, just take a pair of pliers and hack away at the edges! You could also try to apply this to the still smooth edges of the walls and floors of your ruin. The cross-over from crumbling ruin to smooth building is quite abrupt. Also, you can (almost) never have enough rubble! Try to add some gravel and larger pieces of crumpled stonework. Rubble comes in many sizes, from small pebbles to still recognisable chucks of building.

Good tip about the snow! I've not have had any problems with the snow turning yellow, but better be save than sorry!
 

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Finished army! Good job, and isn't it great discovering backlog? Hours more entertainment! If you want those drop pods to disappear though, just let me know...
 
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