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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there guys. I've recently bought the Necron battleforce and I am assembling the warriors and painting them at the moment, but I am having a problem.

After priming the models, I am trying to apply a coat of green to the guns. The problem I am having is that the paint appears to not cover completely.

It's like the paint is too wet and smearing, meaning I have to keep going over the same spot again and again, which just looks awful.

I was wondering if anyone could advise me on what I am doing wrong? :ireful2:
 

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It could be that your primer isn't fully dried before you're trying to paint over it, it may seem at least touch dry but the solvent may still be drying and this will repel the paint. It's like trying to paint over gloss paint with matte, one won't key to the other.

It could also be the primer you are using, is it one that is designed for use with acrylic paints or is it some other form of primer?
 

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It could be that your primer isn't fully dried before you're trying to paint over it, it may seem at least touch dry but the solvent may still be drying and this will repel the paint. It's like trying to paint over gloss paint with matte, one won't key to the other.

It could also be the primer you are using, is it one that is designed for use with acrylic paints or is it some other form of primer?
That could be true regarding the primer. I will try to leave it longer before applying other layers.

The primer is from Games Workshop (Black).
 

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Black primer should be fine for acrylic paints. When you say smearing is this the black mixing with the paints, or the coat is just generally un even? Often if paints are thinned to a sufficient level they will need to coats to get it solid, often more with lighter colours such as red yellow of white. You just have to keep applying layers.

What you can do if you are using non-metallic paints (as metallic ones generally give a solid colour) is to start of with a darker colour and build up to a lighter one e.g if painting white start with a grey basecoat then go to white, it will also make the models look better as you can leave the recesses with the darker paint giving the impressions of shadows. Gw do a Base paint range which give a solid coat in one (sometimes two) layers and have a lighter counterpart, these are good for that 'darker colour'
 

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The Layer paints will take a few coats to get good coverage, I usually need 3 to get Warpstone Glow to cover Black.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The Layer paints will take a few coats to get good coverage, I usually need 3 to get Warpstone Glow to cover Black.
That explains a good deal. I guess I will have to keep practising my painting as these are the first models I've ever painted.
 

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That explains a good deal. I guess I will have to keep practising my painting as these are the first models I've ever painted.
Patience is the key lots of thin coats will give you a much better end result.
 

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It is defiantly worth the patience to give multiple thin coats. Trust me.

I remember the 1st time I used properly thinned down paint and multiple layers, the difference is amazing
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, my first paint job is going horribly and the warriors already look horrendous.

I'm tempted to strip the models down and re-paint them, but I'm worried that I am already falling into the trap of perfectionism rather than using the models for practice. Is this a bad idea to already want to do this?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Can you post up some pictures so we can get better idea of whats going wrong for you?

If it has got to the point of needing to strip them Dettol is the stuff, quick(ish) non toxic and safe.
I will complete a Necron warrior to the best of my ability by tomorrow and post a picture online as soon as possible.

I think my issues stem from not really having a good colour scheme/painting method.

After priming the warriors, I have dry-brushed Necron compound on the armor before washing it in Nuln oil. I guess it doesn't look too bad, but I don't really like how the dry-brushing looks to be honest. The dry-brushing looks streaky and blotchy. :(
 

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It sounds like you may not be taking enough paint off your brush before dry brushing, you need to take nearly all of the paint off leaving just enough to show up when applied to the miniature.

Get some pics up when you can and it will be a lot easier to say what the issue is though.
 

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It doesn't look that bad to be honest, I would have been happy with it as a beginner!

The metallics look good, they could do with a more precise wash in the recesses to bring out the details a little more and possibly a very light dry brush of a brighter metallic which will help the details 'pop' a little more.

As for the green, it looks to be fairly even and the darkness is simply due to it being applied over a black undercoat. In future, for a brighter finish maybe base coat the areas you want to be green in white, it will make the final green colour a little more vibrant.

So far I would say you are definitely on the right track and you're being a little tough on yourself. Minis often look a little funny close up but for use on the table what you have so far is fine, being viewed from a distance they will look great.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It doesn't look that bad to be honest, I would have been happy with it as a beginner!

The metallics look good, they could do with a more precise wash in the recesses to bring out the details a little more and possibly a very light dry brush of a brighter metallic which will help the details 'pop' a little more.

As for the green, it looks to be fairly even and the darkness is simply due to it being applied over a black undercoat. In future, for a brighter finish maybe base coat the areas you want to be green in white, it will make the final green colour a little more vibrant.

So far I would say you are definitely on the right track and you're being a little tough on yourself. Minis often look a little funny close up but for use on the table what you have so far is fine, being viewed from a distance they will look great.
Thanks for the input. Hopefully I can be a little less hard on myself and finish a couple of warriors soon.
 

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A good tip for dry brushing.

When you have wiped off the paint, dry brush your fingernail to check how much paint is coming off of your brush. Finger nails have lots of raised and lowered areas, so it work like a charm.
 
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