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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, first off, dont respond to this thread unless you answer with the following:

detail, examples, thoughtfulness, etc.

I want these EXACT questions answered, and please, straight or yes/no answers are wanted. Feel free to explain, but dont go off confusing me.

1- How should i go about using primer to prime my models? Should I spray a ceratain way, a certain number of times, in certain conditions?

2- My first color or "basecoat." Do I PAINT IT ONE THIN LAYER, OR MULTIPLE THIN LAYERS, OR ONE THICK OR MULTIPLE THICK?

3- any layers after the basecoat layer(s)...should they be painted in one thin layer, or multiple thin layers?

4- How do i paint the model? Up and down strokes? Left to right? Soft? Hard?

5- This applies for GW PAINTS ONLY. What ratio of WATER TO PAINT to you use to thin?

6- How should the paint appear after it is painted on? slighty runny? really runny? stay in place?

If you bother to answer, please do so in a thorough manner.
 

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Ok i'll try my best

1- How should i go about using primer to prime my models? Should I spray a ceratain way, a certain number of times, in certain conditions?

Their should be instruction with it on how to spray ur models with it, if not, U need to shake the can for 2 mins, when spraying short burst at 12" away

2- My first color or "basecoat." Do I PAINT IT ONE THIN LAYER, OR MULTIPLE THIN LAYERS, OR ONE THICK OR MULTIPLE THICK?

Paint multilple thin layers. As thick will obscure the detales of the model. But it also depends on what colour you are useing as the base coat, if using black its best to add a mid colour before you add the base colour as then the base colour will cover the black better, for example... If your paint flesh, use dark flesh first then apply dwarf flesh, u will find u will need less thin coats. If painting blood read on to black add white to make the red pink then apply it to the model, then paint over that once dry with blood red, the red will be alot brighter and will cover better where if u just painted blood red onto black u end up with a reddish brown colour.

3- any layers after the basecoat layer(s)...should they be painted in one thin layer, or multiple thin layers?

yet again thin, for the same reason as above

4- How do i paint the model? Up and down strokes? Left to right? Soft? Hard?

if have watered the paint then brush strokes wont matter, i don't know how i do it, u just do

5- This applies for GW PAINTS ONLY. What ratio of WATER TO PAINT to you use to thin?

It all down to personal tastes, u want it slightly watered down as it helps the paint spread and cover better.

6- How should the paint appear after it is painted on? slighty runny? really runny? stay in place? it should appear wet, but not watery like an ink.

but honist to god, its all down to personal tast and expiriance, u need to have a few test runs she what works what dosen't,

I suggest for you to get your self http://uk.games-workshop.com/storefront/store.uk?do=Individual&code=60049999072&orignav=300810

That should have all the answers you are looking for and more helpful tips
 

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Anphicar said:
Alright, first off, dont respond to this thread unless you answer with the following:

detail, examples, thoughtfulness, etc.

I want these EXACT questions answered, and please, straight or yes/no answers are wanted. Feel free to explain, but dont go off confusing me.

1- How should i go about using primer to prime my models? Should I spray a ceratain way, a certain number of times, in certain conditions?
Again about 12"/30cm away for distance. Begin spraying away from the model then bring the spray across in a smooth even movement. Only do this once. Leave to dry then do again. Yes it take longer but you are avoiding 2 big mistakes. 1) begining to spray directly against the model is bad as the nozel will have residue paint from the last spray which will spit out and potentially land on your model in a blob. 2) By doing one coat and leaving it to dry before coming back you do not allow the actual force of the spray to push the paint across the model and end up collecting in resesses. Again BAD!
Also where you spray is important. Room temp (so not in the cold or heat) and not exposed to moisture and/or air currents (wind, vetelation blowing on it etc). These will affect the condition of the paint while airbourne, drying etc and can ruin a model.

2- My first color or "basecoat." Do I PAINT IT ONE THIN LAYER, OR MULTIPLE THIN LAYERS, OR ONE THICK OR MULTIPLE THICK?
I always go for 2/3 thin layers of paint. NEVER blob a model and put the paint on thick. Go easy and go slightly thiner than normal and you will be fine. It may take slightly longer but will give a better more even coat and not risk any detail been lost.

3- any layers after the basecoat layer(s)...should they be painted in one thin layer, or multiple thin layers?
Again as above, though depending on what you are doing you can progress up through the colour range while maintaining thin coats - this is what i do with my models.

4- How do i paint the model? Up and down strokes? Left to right? Soft? Hard?
Which ever way is easiest for you. There is no right wrong way, provided you do multiple layers and the paint is to the right consistancy (will come to that) then you should mask the actual brush strokes via the nice even coat your layers will provide. Though as a rule if possible always move towards the outside of the model and away from areas that are going to be painted with differnet colours. This will stop you slipping and dashing paint over something else (getting a spot of green on a nice smooth coat of yellow is very frustrating).

5- This applies for GW PAINTS ONLY. What ratio of WATER TO PAINT to you use to thin?
There is no hard fast rule here as all the GW paints acutally have differnet consistancies themselves, and also depending how old and well looked after (i.e not been allowed to dry out) the paint is becomes a huge factor.
It is all about feel here, to try and show what i think is right, go get a brand new pot of Kommando Khaki. That is the consitancy you want your paint to be when it goes on (it is a very thin colour but actaully the prefect level out of pot). It takes practice to learn to guage the right ammount of water needed, but if you apply it in SMALL ammounts you will always get there.

6- How should the paint appear after it is painted on? slighty runny? really runny? stay in place?
It should be smooth, no pulling (coming together) or pooling. The coat should be even and not showing any thick lines where the paint has pilled up around the brush stroke.

Hope that all helps you dude, don't be afraid to ask more.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow, thank you so much Skuzz. Thank you Jamescuk.

I might have questions as i progress, but for clarification:

You say to start spraying the primer and go across in one layer. Then stop.

So, will i do this four times then? Front, then back, then left side, then right side?

Also, what about the parts like under the legs and backpack, i can never get those well.

And one more-- how thin are washes? I want to wash my white space marine in graveyard earth, but i only have scorched brown so ill try that. How much water should be in there?

About what consistency? Milk? Pulpy juice? Mollasses? Cottage Cheese?
 

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1- How should i go about using primer to prime my models? Should I spray a certain way, a certain number of times, in certain conditions?

Step 1, clean the plastic. Plastic mold makers use a solution similar to that used for cooking - so the stuff doesn't stick to the metal molds. This stuff seriously messes with your paint's ability to adhere to plastic. You'll want to wash the plastic with dish soap, a paint stripper, etc. It should loose that pretty new plastic glossy sheen.

Step 2, do it the right way. Use a well ventilated area, like under a fume hood or outside. Secondly, you'll want to spray in smooth motions, not stopping while over the model. the best way to avoid un wanted buildup is to actually start spraying before you cross the model, and don't stop until after you've completely passed the model.

() --- <> --- [] () = start of spray, <> is the mini and [] is when you stop spraying. You want to move in a smooth fluid movement.

Step 3, have patience. Don't try and go over one last time because you missed one spot and if you getthatoenspotyoudon'thevetkfvbwkagb...
Just leave it alone!

2- My first color or "basecoat." Do I PAINT IT ONE THIN LAYER, OR MULTIPLE THIN LAYERS, OR ONE THICK OR MULTIPLE THICK?

3- any layers after the basecoat layer(s)...should they be painted in one thin layer, or multiple thin layers?


I put these together because all colors should be put on in the same manner. Thin layers, and as many as needed to create the desired effect.

4- How do i paint the model? Up and down strokes? Left to right? Soft? Hard?

This one is easy. You paint in the direction that is easiest. the trick is, once you've painted in a certain direction, you aren't allowed to paint in that same direction until you've gone in two different ones. Say you're painting in a horizontal direction ------- you then want to go vertical |||| and then in a directional ////// or \\\\\\. I prefer all 4 before going back to the first. The reason? It's the same reason you change the direction each time you mow your lawn - you don't want to make ruts. Paint will do the same thing, and if you go in the same direction every layer, you'll end up blotchy, uneven coverage and streaks.

5- This applies for GW PAINTS ONLY. What ratio of WATER TO PAINT to you use to thin?

I use one brushful of water per 3-4 brushfuls of paint. It's very much a feel thing. You want a consistency of that a little thicker than milk. Know how milk kind of takes a sec to completely drain off the side of a glass when you slosh it around? You want your paint to do that.

Another thing you can do is dilute the entire bottle. I DO NOT suggest this, as it sets the entire pot of paint at a new consistency. And the only way to un-dilute paint is to let it dry and try to resurrect it and that's super hard.

6- How should the paint appear after it is painted on? slighty runny? really runny? stay in place?

Not runny at all, unless you've really slathered it on... No, it should be glossy, and maybe a little see-thru, but if you tilt the model, none of it should move. It shouldn't be hard to move around, it shouldn't be sticky, or chunky or problematic or anything. Again, it's a feel thing. If you've achieved a good paint consistency, your paint should go on the model just fine.

If you bother to answer, please do so in a thorough manner.

I hope I have, and I hope it's worked!!
 

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1. When spray undercoating you want to get a nice even layer. The best way of doing this is either to use a disposable glove or some kitchen roll to cover you hand and hold the model whilst you spray it. That way you can turn it to get it underneath, etc.

2. Personally i wash my brush and wipe off the excess water on the side of the jar, then use the excess water on the brush to water the paint down. Sometimes i may add a little more. but i just do that on the rim/lip of the paint pot[obviously unless im mixing the paint] Mostly i only need one coat but if its a thin colour like yellow for example then several may be needed

3. I use exactly the same method as above.

4. I generally use downwards strokes. But it depends on the affect your going for at the time. If you are trying to highlight the edge of a raised surface for example then i find using the edge of the brush and dragging the brush across sideways allows it to just pick out the edge.

5. half a brush tip

6. mostly it should not be watered enough to make its "runny" but enough so it brushes on smoothly. I dont think you need to water paints overly, as its just to help with the application. If you are painting very fine details like giving eyes pupils then slightly more water helps the paint to comes off the brush onto the surface easily, making it easier to dot in. But you have to be careful again not to over water so the paint does pool onto the model as soon as you touch the model.
 

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Also, what about the parts like under the legs and backpack, i can never get those well.
U will never get the whole model, i would go over it with a more watered down black/white to make sure u get all the noocks a crannies.

Also use short burst, not long burst with the spray can, as it will save the amount you are useing
 

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Jamescuk said:
Also use short burst, not long burst with the spray can, as it will save the amount you are useing
Heh, as well, "burst" in and of itself is generally not long, now is it ;). Aside from saving the contents of the can, it's much more even. Think about it. If you held down the nozzle straight at it, it would pool and come out uneven. With short bursts and fluid movement, you cover every little bit of detail whilst preserving it.

Anyway, here's usually how I do it:


1- How should i go about using primer to prime my models? Should I spray a ceratain way, a certain number of times, in certain conditions?

Read above for proper movement and spraying. Usually you just want enough of a coat on there so that no grey is showing. As for conditions, the paint dries faster when it's warmer out. As well, why would you want to be outside if it's really damn cold out?

2- My first color or "basecoat." Do I PAINT IT ONE THIN LAYER, OR MULTIPLE THIN LAYERS, OR ONE THICK OR MULTIPLE THICK?

Multiple thin. That way, one, you preserve detail, and two, have total control over the amount of paint you put on the model. Who knows, maybe after two or three layers one model is satisfactory where it might take four or five to get another model done right. Human error.

3- any layers after the basecoat layer(s)...should they be painted in one thin layer, or multiple thin layers?

It really depends on what you're painting. For instance, you've basecoated a model with Dark Angels Green, but want to work up to a green inbetween say Dark Angels and Catachan. If that's the case (a horrible example, I know, but my mind is kind of shot right now), then as always, if one layer doesn't suffice, slap on another one.

4- How do i paint the model? Up and down strokes? Left to right? Soft? Hard?

Soft up and down strokes keep the paint even. The more pressure you put on the model while you're painting, especially plastic, in all likelyhood you could snap off little plastic bits or any glue work. As well, to my eyes anyway, up and down streaks, in the unfortunate cirumstance that they're there, are far less noticeable than those done left to right. It's the way the light catches it. If a light is shining down on the model, the left to right streaks act as light catchers, almost, and make them way more prominent.

5- This applies for GW PAINTS ONLY. What ratio of WATER TO PAINT to you use to thin?

I used to be dumb and have a little jar of water next to me, take the paint on the brush, stick it in the water for a bit to get a decent consistency, then apply to the model. Doesn't really work to well. I'd say for a full pot of paint, 1:5 ratio of water to paint. You don't want too much, otherwise you'll end up with a horrible substitute for ink. A good test I always use is add little amounts of water at a time, then shake the pot. If it sounds like it's moving around in there, but not too much (read: ink substitute), then it's about right. Again, you'll never, ever get an exact ratio for every paint, mostly because there's still human error involved, and the GW paints have different consistencies. Chaos Black is incredibly viscous and will require more water, whereas Skull White is quite chalky, so you want to add just a little bit to even it out. (Yes, I'm one of those people who adds the water in straight to the pot, then when I'm painting if it needs to be watered down more, I'll take care of it then and there.

6- How should the paint appear after it is painted on? slighty runny? really runny? stay in place?

You certainly want it to stay in place with gravity in mind. If it's runny, it'll drip down into places where you don't want it, potentially mixing with still wet paint or leaving streaks. Slightly runny I guess is okay in my experience because it's not too runny, the water helps to even out in the drying process. It can be a boon and a complete and total nightmare if you don't get it right, though.
 
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