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Discussion Starter #1
The loft in my house is finaly being eptyed and I am allowed to turn it into my gaming room. Theres going to br the usual up there gaming board tv games consle stereo.

This the problem I cant decide how the gaming board will look like so anyone got any ideas?
 

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First decide if the board is going to be 6'x4' or 8'x4'. (I personally think 6' is plenty for what it's worth.)

Then there's your theme. Cityfight appears the most popular, especially with all the new Imperium buildings that have been released, and the new Cityfight codex. But this you could modify to be a Hive/Underhive.

You could also mix it a little and have some wooded areas on your city board for additional variety.

There's also how much battle damage the place has received. Is the place still pristine, damaged, in ruins, or in absolute ruins?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok I'm thinking 8'x4' because I do alot of 2 people versus 2 people so the extra room will be good. I do like the imperial city terrain stuff but it cost a lot of money and seeing I've spent alot on warhammer already I don't really want to spend a hell of a lot on just terrain. I'd like it to be in between damaged and in ruins.
 

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Ehh...Say whatever you want.

Anyways. I'd suggest an 8X4 board permanantly set up. You can then create several different themes for it and place unused terrain in containers beneathe the table. Tha

I have an 8X4 C.O.D. table in my garage. Beneath it I have a RubberMaid container full of my jungle terrain. I am currently working on several different themes.

You can get an 8x4 sheet of cloth for each land type (white for snow, green for forrest, tan for dessert, grey for city, etc.) from a fabric store. When you want to play one of the themes, just pull out the container with that particular theme and set it up.

It allows great diversity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
8x4 is a bit big but I can see what your saying
 

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Ehh...Say whatever you want.

Anyways. I'd suggest an 8X4 board permanantly set up. You can then create several different themes for it and place unused terrain in containers beneathe the table. Tha

I have an 8X4 C.O.D. table in my garage. Beneath it I have a RubberMaid container full of my jungle terrain. I am currently working on several different themes.

You can get an 8x4 sheet of cloth for each land type (white for snow, green for forrest, tan for dessert, grey for city, etc.) from a fabric store. When you want to play one of the themes, just pull out the container with that particular theme and set it up.

It allows great diversity.
Brilliant idea that, all you need is cloth and some basic terrain peices, homemade or bought. I am backing up that idea!
 

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If you don't want to shell out for cityfight terrain, and who could blame you, make it at home for nothing... from crap. Boxes, polystyrene, plastic packaging, collect it all, drive anyone you live with mental with the junk lying around (really, they should be used to it by now), spray it grey and sometimes silver or bright green... Bob's your uncle. Damn site cheaper than buying it, and you won't feel so bad when you decide to attack it with glue/matches to represent the bio-acid and firestorms that have been raining down on your city.

If you're at all handy with a scalpel, there's no reason it should look crappy. Me, I'm an orc, everything I do looks it's been done by a blind hippo with no feet, but I've seen some great city terrain that's been completely scratch-built, some of it on threads on this board.

Go for it, you know it makes sense!

 

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From experience (many years ago) I can tell you that you certainly don't want a fixed permanent terrain. It soon becomes boring, and your regular opponents get to know that the distance from the right table edge to the right hand building is 7 inches, and the front of that building is 23 inches away from the ruin on the other side of the table...you can see where I'm going.

A good sturdy table with the top surface painted in whatever is your commonest terrain type - or something that is in keeping with the way you do your bases, it's YOUR board, after all - and then you have the option of using cloths to change it's colour, as someone else has already described. Although I'm not sure I'd bother, to be honest.

Then add some separate terrain pieces: hills are obvious, but think about how you choose to represent other types of area terrain. Essentially, there are two core choices: the GW method is usually to make a base, fix the models that represent the terrain (trees, ruins, etc) to it, and then sand/flock/paint to taste. The advantage is that such pieces can be stunning vignettes in and of themselves. The drawbacks are that if you build four woods and then try a scenario that needs 5, you're stuck; you only have a fixed set of wood/whatever shapes; and they can be awkward to store - you can't usually stack them on top of each other.

Another approach is to make a variety of sizes and shapes in whatever material you plan to use as the base of your area terrain features, paint/flock etc to taste, and then place your trees and such like loose on them. The base defines the limits of the feature, and the trees, rocks etc are markers that tell you what sort of feature it is.

The advantages are primarily flexibility: if you have 15 different shapes and sizes, you potentially have 15 different shapes and sizes of any feature you have markers for. If you need 6 woods for a special game, you just spread your stock of trees around 6 bases, instead of three or four. The flat bases will stack, and your trees and such like can live in boxes. When you move figures through the terrain, you never have issues with not being able to stand stuff up: since the tree or rock is only a marker for the type of terrain, you just move it out of the way. The base itself defines what the limits of the terrain are, not the models used to label it.

Obviously, this approach is not going to be as pretty as the GW approach - although it is still possible to make nice vignettes of the models used as markers: two trees, or a tree and some bushes, or a clump of rocks on a base about the size of a beermat, for example - but it can still look good, and is very flexible. As an example: if you need a wooded hill, you can simply place some of your based tree models on one of your hills: with the GW method, you either have to remember that one of your woods is also a hill, or one of your hills is also wooded, or stop and build a wooded hill...

Just some random ramblings.

Johno
 

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Discussion Starter #12
oops i forgot about this thread. The whole loft conversion thing is on standby for a while something happened christmas day which has effected my family sevearly and has gotten worse over the year so I don't really want to be taking on a large project and my parents don't want to spend a load of money yet.
 

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I would definitely use based terrain as opposed to fixed and for a lot of 2 on 2 games I'd go with an 8'x4' table. But, I would suggest modular terrain in
2'x2' squares that are double sided. That way you can mix and match so that you can have a large variety of playing surfaces.
 

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I vote for modular if you have little to no game space, but definately go non-modular for a big table. Non modular tables allow you to have cooler terrain. You can add catwalks and stuff.

-Dirge
 
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