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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hey there guys, this is a pic of my third painted SM, my first painted seargent.

By earcar, shot with KODAK DX6490 ZOOM DIGITAL CAMERA at 2008-01-06


By earcar, shot with KODAK DX6490 ZOOM DIGITAL CAMERA at 2008-01-06

Edit: Gah. Photos reveal the flaws TOO much if you know what I mean :)

Yea, the face isn't too pretty. I just used elf flesh and bolt gon metal for the metal parts. couldn't paint any features for a lack of a smaller brush :( For the chainsword main part, I used a combo of Chaos Black and boltgun metal, and for the chain bits, I used a combo of Skull white and boltgun metal. The rest is straightforward. I'm open to criticism, as long as its constructive.
 

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your paint looks a little thick, you should look into a technique called drybrushing

with drybrushing you paint the model inside out, start with darks and drybrush the lights ontop of them, continuing to get lighter until the desired effect is reached, it simulates a lighting situation called ambient occlusion, where the contact shadows are in the cracks.

also, watch your undercoat colors, you want neutral or analogous colors, looks to me like you got blue under the loincloth and its showing through a little.

keep at it, the first few are always ify.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Actually, my undercoat is black, I forget why I painted the cloth blue, must've thought it wouldn't show. For undercoating, the paint is usually thin, right?
 

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yes as thin as possible, its pretty easy to screw up the undercoat if your spraypainting, but I still find that undercoating black spray is the best way to do it.

as for the flesh, get yourself some fleshink, and mix it with a little water, dab at it till its uniformly coated, then when its dry you'll have perfect shading. then you can paint eyebrows and eyes as you see fit, but its not necessary.
 

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Not bad for a 3rd model ever. A few tips though:

1) remove the mould lines on the model as it REALLY detracts from even the best paint job

2) you need to thin your paints more. For every part paint, you should have one part water. This will require more layers and a bit more time but will look much better in the end

3) when you have finished the paint on an area, go over any areas that SHOULDN'T be that colour with your basecoat colour, in this case black. Doing so will help clean up the model and make the colours and the separations between them stand out a bit more.


Not trying to diss you or anything as this is stuff that every one of us has to learn once we start into this hobby. Applying these tips will go a long way to making your models really stand out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No offence taken Wraithlord. Thanks for all of your advice. I'l make sure to do those things for my next model!
 

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Quite good for a third mini indeed, know mine where a whole lott worse :wink:

Looks like all good starting advice has more or less been given already, so I can just add a tip for a bit more advanced technique. Addin depth (some call it inking, others washes or even blacklining), an easy way to give your mini more depth is to take a normal brush with a sharp point. Next mix some of the colour (lets take the blue for the armour here) and add a tiny bit black, making to colour a bit darker. Next wather down this combo and using the brushtip and a little bit of the watery darker blue in the deeper areas of the armour.

And voila instant depth and more detail, combine this with drybrushing and highlighting and you'll be pumping out great minis in a matter of months.

Oh and this is naturally just a humble suggestion, it is afterall a creative hobby and it is much better and fun to find your own way and style.
 

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what i use to paint skin:
dark flesh (all over)
flesh wash (all over)
dwarf flesh (all over exept in gaps ie; eyes, mouth
elf flesh (on bridge of nose and raised sections

produces brilliant skin

oh yeah. to be honest, dont bother watering down paints if its only your third. im 6 months in, with half a battle company, and i have never mixed paints. ill post pictures if i can
 

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Hi Earcar

I cannot add to the advice that has been given, but I can tell you a little bit from my own experience.

Your effort on the model is GREAT, and you will find that every model that you paint, will become better and better and better... ad infinitum!

I think the two biggest effects that you can try, that will add the most value to your model, and make an INSTANT difference are:

1. A little bit of an ink wash over the model
(Which is also very easy, just slap a watered down chestnut or brown ink over the model. You will find that the ink tends to flow into the recesses. If there's any leftover ink on raised edges, (while the model dries), you can remove it by taking a clean brush, and just suck the excess ink back up.)
2. A little bit of a drybrush on the model
(Which is a little more difficult to get right. Use a lighter color than the one that’s already on the model. Take an old brush and put a little bit of paint on the brush. Brush the paint onto a scrap piece of newspaper until there’s almost no paint left. Then move to your model and lightly brush over the part that you want drybrushed. You will find that the paint will add gradually to the model. This is GOOD! Do not try to drybrush with one pass of the brush. That would be too much paint!)

Try these two effects on your next model, and compare them with your previous work. You will notice the difference. Then it’s back to the forums to find a new effect to try out.

That’s why I like modeling so much! We all learn from each other!

Keep up the good work, and show us your next attempts!

Regards

Orffer
 

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Personally I don't find drybrushing to be the best technique on marines. It works well on stuff like fur. On armour plates it won't ever get you as good an effect as you can get by painting on the highlights and using inks, which honestly isn't very difficult. I think you may as well start doing it the right way instead of practicing a technique that you will stop using sooner or later. In any case you don't really need to highlight anything just yet.

Thinning paints really is something you can do from day one. It makes painting easier, not harder, so you really might as well.

Cutting off mould lines is a real chore. If you keep the models for a long time it will pay off, but if you end up chucking them out in 6 months when you are a much better painter then maybe it won't have been worth it. It's good practice though as sooner or later you won't be able to tolerate mould lines.

To summarise then the first thing I'd recommend is to thin your paints. Try all the other techniques depending on the time you have available. Maybe if you have some of the orks from BFM you could use them to practice on (in whatever colours you want). Good job so far anyway. Keep it up.
 

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Cutting off mould lines is a real chore. If you keep the models for a long time it will pay off, but if you end up chucking them out in 6 months when you are a much better painter then maybe it won't have been worth it.
NO DON'T THROW YOUR MODELS AWAY! if you decide you don't like them its better to strip the paint off them using a toothbrush and simplegreen.

also, removing mold lines really isn't that bad My technique is to take my hobby knife and to hold it up against the seam with the knifeedge perpendicular to the seam

imagine this cross section the shape with the "V" is the knife, the line on bottom is your surface and the periods are the direction of motion
..............._
..............| |
..............| |
._________V_________


then just scrape the knife along the seam a few times, and viola, its gone.
 

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I dunno the paint is really thick. We all have to start somewhere and learn and I'm sure we all have a similar mini if we haven't stripped it from our early days.

However the paint is really globby so a few suggestions for your next that are simple and easy...
1. get some decent brushes I find you can get a good set of Nylon brushes at any art store for around $11. I paint for other people and go through about a set every month. IE if your trying to use those cheap-o black nylon brush that have thick bristles...don't. If your using GW brushes then you should be fine.
2. Keep your brush damp. Clean it in a cup of water, and then wipe it off on a paper towel until no more water comes off onto the towel. Do this every time you go to dip it in the paint pot.
3. Get a small dinner plate or plastic tray, and paint a few strokes onto it. This loads the brush properly, and will make your paints go on much smoother.
 
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