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Discussion Starter #4
Gods I wish I had that kind of money to throw around.

I know right?!?!?1 I sure has hell wouldn't by a card with it, I don't care how much I love MTG.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just to avoid confusion, people don't buy these to use. It's an investment, more like shares or antiques than cards.

Midnight

well that makes more sense.
 

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As someone who owns a FLGS (or, well, owns a company which is opening a FLGS soon, I should say) I've discovered Magic's secondary market is a necessary evil of being in the gaming business. People look at cards like Black Lotus and go nuts over the value they sell for, but what really makes Magic such an expensive game to play (and such a solid investment, really) are the $30-$50 things on the reserve list. A Black Lotus is only valuable to a collector, and it's not something a store will likely have in their singles case to sell, just because to get anything even approaching the value of the card, it can take years to sell it. Shocks and duals, the legacy playable planeswalkers, and the ten or so good cards in Standard, though? Those are generally in the $30-50 range, and you can basically be asleep at the wheel and they sell, because anyone serious about actually playing Magic is looking for four copies of those cards. I find it hard to give a damn about Black Lotus when there are cards out there I can actually turn around (and not have to have a separate insurance policy on) like the majority of legacy staples.

As someone in the game retail business, I *have* to be involved with Magic, like I said. Love it or hate it, it's just a part of the business. I've found there's infinitely more going on with Magic than pretty much anything else... and it kind of has my mind blown. The learning curve I've been on in the last month or so learning about the secondary market, investments in Legacy cards, speculation on value of new releases that haven't settled into a stable place in the market yet, etc... it's been nuts.
 

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Rattlehead
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Shocks and duals, the legacy playable planeswalkers, and the ten or so good cards in Standard, though? Those are generally in the $30-50 range, and you can basically be asleep at the wheel and they sell, because anyone serious about actually playing Magic is looking for four copies of those cards. I find it hard to give a damn about Black Lotus when there are cards out there I can actually turn around (and not have to have a separate insurance policy on) like the majority of legacy staples.
This, so much. The real money in the aftermarket is in the 'fancy lands', as my friend used to say; shock lands, tap lands, then the nifty unique ones like Drownyards. As you say, every competitive Magic player wants a full set of them.

Midnight
 

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This, so much. The real money in the aftermarket is in the 'fancy lands', as my friend used to say; shock lands, tap lands, then the nifty unique ones like Drownyards. As you say, every competitive Magic player wants a full set of them.

Midnight
At least in "high dollar" playable cards (i.e., the $30-50 ones). The real money in the secondary market, from a retail standpoint, is actually bulk rares and the $2-5 stuff. Typically, you buy bulk rares at $0.10 a piece, and sell them at a dollar a piece. They move fast since it's not much of an investment to pick up a playset of a given bulk rare. The $2-5 stuff tend to be powerful cards for non-organized players... i.e., people who play Magic and want to be good in their circle of friends or immediate playgroup, but aren't looking to be competitive in organized tournaments and the like. For every one competitive player (in the sense of a DCI-registered, cut-throat event attendee) there are like ten or twenty who are not especially focused on events but just play Magic. And those people eat up the $2-5 stuff like mad. A lot of them will pick up a $5 rare instead of buying a booster pack, in my experience. The place you make money on boosters is by holding frequent drafts. Yes, that's essentially selling four packs for the price of three, but you do much larger volume as a draft destination than if you just are selling them each for $4.23 after tax.
 

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Sadly it is the truth, some idiots will pay top notch money for these old cards just to say, "I own that one; want to see it?" I had a gentlemen buy my "Champions of Kamiguwa" for roughly $400.00 with Lands included. Didn't tell him the value was only really $250.00 thoughly :wink:

In any case, MTG Nerds and Fans don't really care to much for money. For this reason alone I stopped play MTG because I saw the many players who wasted their ENTIRE income on just Cards for each new relase. I saw people who would(No Joke!!) starve themselves for days just to ensure they had the necessary funds to get the lastest and greatest cards. Even those with Low-Income, who should be saving their hard earned money, were wasting the money on MTG Cards.

Why these people are willing to pay such wild amounts of money for little trading cards is anyones guess. However the trend, which waxes and wanes, is on the rise currently; and more than once I have heard younger kids tell me they will be rich by "trading" these cards. They really are....dellusional to say the least.

Anyway long story short to this rant is that while Magic: The Gathering is an excellent game to play; the price is not worth sacking your life over. In the end your cards only last 3 years, and are utterlly worthless unless you know the right people.
 

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You can say the same about any hobby though - look at the people who spend £7000 on a Space Marine Chapter in one go...

MTG is fun and I enjoyed playing it, but my only major gripe is the obsession with Standard - even in casual gaming groups. I don't like having to completely restart or demolish my decks simply because a lynchpin card has rotated out, I'd rather just keep playing and tweaking without being forced to reinvent through peer pressure (I'm not talking about official events).
 

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look at the people who spend £7000 on a Space Marine Chapter in one go
This is true Sethis, but that person probably had the money, and didn't need to starve themselves over it. I'm sure he had planned it out, or bought it as a gift; not sacking his bills to milk the money out. My point here is that I can beleive 27k for a Collection, because too many people either want them, or are desperate to buy/resell them.
 

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If I had the cash I'd buy a set of Power 9. It's not even a question.

Though 27K is WAY beyond what I would spend on a single card, much less the set.

Plus Alpha isn't even the more expensive one, it's Beta that everyone wants.
 
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