Warhammer 40k Forum and Wargaming Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I've been using washes for a long while, and I have some (red, blue, smokey, black, sepia, skin) bottles of Vallejo inks at home, that I realized I hardly ever use.:shok:

What are they best used for?
How to use them most effectively?
Could you give examples?
Inks vs. washes?
What are characteristics?
Anyone used VGC Smokey Ink or VMS Smoke?
How about VGC skin ink

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,182 Posts
I use smokey ink all the time. Its pretty much the same as devlan mud and does act very much like a wash. I cant see any differences generally but they do leave a gloss finish and not a more matt finish you get from the GW washes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I use smokey ink all the time. Its pretty much the same as devlan mud and does act very much like a wash. I cant see any differences generally but they do leave a gloss finish and not a more matt finish you get from the GW washes.
Smokey ink is a quite thick paste. How do you apply it? dilute heavilywith water?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,182 Posts
I just water it down if it is too thick. The bottle does need to be well shaken if it has been standing for any length of time.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,544 Posts
The key difference between inks and washes is the kind of varnish they're made with. Inks are typically made using a satin varnish, so you'll get a slightly glossy effect with them if you use them like a wash; whereas washes are made using a matte medium.

When you use inks, you're after much more targeted application. While you certainly can use them as a wash, they need to be diluted with water just like regular paint, and you may need to apply two coats to get the effect you're after. Inks shine in defining hard details, such as the joins between armor plates or the shadows right next to a hard edge. While you can do that with a wash (and many people do), the bolder, higher pigment count of ink makes it better suited to that task. Washes are intended more as a means to bring sharp highlights in line with one another, and create a false gradient on the model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The key difference between inks and washes is the kind of varnish they're made with. Inks are typically made using a satin varnish, so you'll get a slightly glossy effect with them if you use them like a wash; whereas washes are made using a matte medium.

When you use inks, you're after much more targeted application. While you certainly can use them as a wash, they need to be diluted with water just like regular paint, and you may need to apply two coats to get the effect you're after. Inks shine in defining hard details, such as the joins between armor plates or the shadows right next to a hard edge. While you can do that with a wash (and many people do), the bolder, higher pigment count of ink makes it better suited to that task. Washes are intended more as a means to bring sharp highlights in line with one another, and create a false gradient on the model.
Thanks! could you please show an example?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top