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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Heresy, I need some help.

Browsing the GW website, I found this - the wonderful Traitors of Chaos. The classic Emperor's Children marine really struck me as a fantastic paint scheme. Having added it to my ever-expanding mental wishlist, I was thinking of attempting to paint a few models like this to see how it goes.

The only thing is, how would I go about this?

I am familiar with the "painting jargon," but not brilliant with the application - something I am constantly improving on.
 

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looks like they dry brushed a 1/2 tenticle pink 1/2 warlock purple on the key armor spots, then they took a 3/4 tenticle pink 1/4 warlock purple mix and highlighted the armor.
 

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you could wet blend and you would get the same affect. It would be easier if you take a smaller brush head and dry brush around the spots you want the affect on. you want to make sure most the paint is off of the brush. concentrate around the main spot and then work your way out. but yea ill run a test try out on a spare marine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Drybrushing is a lot easier so I think I will go with that. If you could do that, I would really appreciate it! That would make this a lot easier. :)

EDIT: Do you think any washes are in order, other than for the pink helmet?
 

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I don't mean to break your enthusiams, folks - but where so you see any opportunity for drybrushing? Or washes?

That's good, old-school blending going on there - and trying to emulate it with drybrushing would spoil the miniature.

(my 2 cents)
 

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Cmdr.Krull is right, definitely not dry brushing. It's blending with an extreme highlight.
Work in very thin coats working from dark to light. If you're not sure about wet blending (I think it's a type of witchcraft!) then do it in layers with very subtle changes between coats, lightening the paint a tiny amount each time then add a very bright highlight to the extreme edges.

Remember to use VERY thinned down paints or it will look awful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Blending - that sounds difficult. How on earth do I do this? Do I stick with the same colors that 5tonsledge mentioned?
 

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Pretty much but the transition would be more gradual.
Dry brushing is ok for speed but it looks poor with any level of scrutiny. It's ok to drybrush things like hair or fur, even scenery like gravel. but for drybrushing to work you need a textured surface not a smooth SM leg.
As I said above, I'm not great with Blending as a technique, I prefer to layer with gradual colour changes.
Start with a black undercoat, then use a very thinned down dark purple and leave the the recesses black. Then, one layer at a time, lighten your paint mix and work towards the highlight. Do this until you have a slightly brighter than mid tone finish one the edge of the armour, then paint a very thin line of bright highlight right on the edge.
 

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Thats a preference thing, I tend to water mine down to around the consistency of milk but some colours take better to being thinned than others. A rule of thumb is to test them on something. If they go on smoothly without pooling on recesses then that's about right. Too thin and they will run everywhere and make a mess, too thick and they will clump up and you lose detail. Remember that with your paints thinned they will take a lot more coats to cover the black undercoat, this is fine as you need them to be semi transparent for the effect to work. Be patient, take your time and don't rush things.
Also don't expect GD levels of awesome first time round, it will take practice to get it right.
But, nothing worth doing was ever easy!

Best of luck and I hope thats of some help, post up your progress and happy painting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am sorry I am asking so many questions. I just want to do this the right way when I start practicing.

I am sort of embarrassed asking this, but how do I water down paint?

When I am picking colors, I stick to the Citadel range, and their purple selection is sort of low. Warlock Purple and Hormagaunt purple. Hormagaunt Purple is lighter than Warlock, assuming I am not color blind, so would the next step be a Tentacle Pink? It just seems to big of a jump.

I tossed you some reputation for all of your help.
 

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Start with the darkest purple you have (not foundation paint), I use a wet palette which makes life a whole lot easier (details coming up!) use a brush to put some paint onto your palette then dip your brush into water and add it to the paint a little at a time. As you're starting out, test a little each time you add water until it feels right. Like I said it will take time to get this right but stick with it as it's a cool technique to use.
When you are happy with the first coat see how bright the colour looks, it may need a couple of coats of paint to get the coverage that you are looking for. Then add a little of your tentacle pink to the mix to bring the shade up a tiny amount, then go over the first colour leaving some of the original showing. Again, remember that you are working with very thin paints and it will seem like you are getting nowhere to begin with, trust me and stick with it!
With each successive coat add a little more of the lighter colour until your mix is almost pure tentacle pink. This should be your second to last highlight, so lots of layers!
for your final highlight add skull white to the mix and paint a tiny thin line of it along the edge or the armour. Use the side of the brush and gently pull it across the area you are highlighting.
Invest in some Simple Green so if you screw up or are not happy with the end result you can strip the mini and start again.


WET PALETTE.
There is a thread that goes into more detail about this and I'll post a link if I can find it!
Get and old plastic plate and fill the recess with sheets of kitchen paper, five layers should be plenty. Then soak it under the tap until it can't hold any more water. Poor off the excess but dont squeeze out the paper, it needs to be sodden.
Take a sheet of baking parchment cut to the size of the plate with enough to over hang a little. Lay this ontop of the wet kitchen paper and press down very gently to remove any air pockets. The underside should be in full contact with the water.
now, use this like you would use any other palette. It will stop your paints drying out for hours.
I found it on Heresy and must give full credit to Damned Fist for the idea!

Thanks for the rep, it's no problem.
Remember, this is not an easy technique to get right first time but a little patience will pay off.
Stick with it and I look forward to seeing your work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh, I see! Stick with the darkest purple, increase the lightness of the color by adding the pink until the mix is pink. It sounds labor intense, but it will be worth it indeed! Awesome. I will have to gather these materials and start right away!

Now, my final question. You said leave the some of the original color showing. How should I go about this? The answer seems obvious, but I want to make sure I have every step of this down before I take the plunge. Is it merely that each successive layer I do not paint the entire area covered in each "region" (legs, arms, shoulder pads, so forth)? How much space do I leave between each new coat?

Once I am ready I will most certainly be posting a log! Feedback is always good and it will keep my interested for sure.

Again, I thank you!
 

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I think Norm has done plenty of explaining, but here's a nice tutorial all the same:

http://www.heresy-online.net/forums/showthread.php?t=3346

And the awesome wet palette tutorial:

http://www.heresy-online.net/forums/showthread.php?t=4776

Now, my final question. You said leave the some of the original color showing. How should I go about this? The answer seems obvious, but I want to make sure I have every step of this down before I take the plunge. Is it merely that each successive layer I do not paint the entire area covered in each "region" (legs, arms, shoulder pads, so forth)? How much space do I leave between each new coat?
If you want to practice then try it out on a nice flat surface to start with, like the top of a spare base.

Choose 3 colours that go from dark to light (lets say DA green, snot green, scorpion green) and paint the whole thing in the darkest colour.

Then mix a tiny amount of the lighter colour in, and paint the whole thing minus a tiny portion at the edge of the base. the difference between the colours should be hardly noticeable. Ifind it helps the blending if you paint with strokes in the direction of the lighter section.

Continue to do this, leaving a tiny portion each time and you'll come out with a nice gradient that goes through the colours.

This is one of mine using the technique. Obviously it's not as good as the 'eavy metal job, but hopefully my flaws will make the stages easier to see :p



The hardest thing with blending and layering i find is getting the lighting right. Using the pic on the GW site to follow should help you out a lot though.

Good luck!
 

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For the issue on "getting the lighting right", i prefer to take a reference photo of the unpainted miniature with the correct lighting and stick it to my painting corner's wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You guys are giving my wonderful advice, and I thank you! However, questions keep getting raised. Thankfully enough I do have spare bases so I believe I will try it.

Now, when I am doing it on the base, what do you mean by a tiny portion? Like to the edge of the circle? And each coat I leave yet another space, meaning I will see the first color and then the second color? Thus then a third coat would produce me seeing the first coat, second coat and third coat, and so forth?

In regards to purples, what should I use? Warlock Purple to Hormagaunt Purple to Tentacle Pink?
 

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Don't use Hormagaunt purple, it's a foundation paint and will kill the effect stone dead.
Foundation paints have way more pigment in them and will cover anything with a single coat. For this effect you need to stick to standard paints.

Start with Liche Purple and work to Warlock Purple, leave a tiny bit of each layer showing. Then work from warlock purple to Tentacle Pink.

So, yes, if you do 5 layers you will have 5 visible colours. The trick is to make them so close together in colour that the transition is almost invisible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Perfect! This is great! I thank all of you for your help! I hope to get started as soon as possible. Look for the "Choir of Discord" in the Project Log section in the coming weeks.
 
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