Warhammer 40k Forum and Wargaming Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I finished the omnibus earlier this year and it's been a while since I've looked into it. While his methods are obviously Xanthite does he actually adhere to the faction's beliefs? Or is he just a radical that uses Xanthite methods but doesn't follow any specific doctrine? If he still considers himself an Amalathian I hate to break it to him but he's about as far off from that faction as possible.

I'm pretty sure that his case files and career as a whole is used within the Ordo Scarus as an example of the atypical fall from righteousness. While his actions fit in with Oblationism more than the mainstream Xanthite the rest of the Ordo Scarus / Helican definitely sees him as one of the fallen. Obviously the Holy Ordos being the Holy Ordos their version of his story has been changed and twisted from the original. Didn't Osma and Horse-face Heldane want to use Cherubael for their own gain? Heldane is obviously a radical but Osma was seen as a closet Monodominant and a hard-lined puritan in the Ordo Malleus. If I remember correctly he was Grandmaster which made it even more surprising.

Eisenhorn doesn't follow the tenets of Xanthism or adhere to their philosophy. Maybe in more recent times he's begun to drift towards that faction but can he be considered an example of a Xanthite?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
I think he uses Xanthite methods, but wouldn't consider himself one. His whole story is about his unintentional fall to Chaos, and I think he resisted every step of the way. It didn't help him in the end, though. Then again, I think he views Cherubael as a powerful tool - especially after obliterating a Chaos Titan and killing Glaw - and he uses it to do the Emperor's work.

Obviously, even though both declarations of diabolus were rescinded, some puritanical inquisitors will still see him as unfit to serve. I think he's somewhere in the middle.
 

·
Angryman
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
At the end he pretty much admits to himself that he is a radical(I seem to recall, even if he did not cherubael pretty much marks him as a radical). And yes he was an alamathian to begin with though not any more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It's blatantly obvious that he is a radical but I meant whether or not he was just a radical or Xanthite. I'm guessing he's just a radical since he doesn't have any ties to the faction or adheres to its goals. He isn't the biggest fan of politics, funny considering his Amalathian background, so I could see him working towards his own goals, outside of the official channels, factions, conclaves and ordos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
It's blatantly obvious that he is a radical but I meant whether or not he was just a radical or Xanthite. I'm guessing he's just a radical since he doesn't have any ties to the faction or adheres to its goals. He isn't the biggest fan of politics, funny considering his Amalathian background, so I could see him working towards his own goals, outside of the official channels, factions, conclaves and ordos.
Even as an Amalathian, he considered the factions counterproductive and thought all of the Inquisition should work together to combat Chaos. Wouldn't be surprised if he just removed himself from all of it, especially if he has a pet daemon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
I think many of these definitions and labels are just security blankets for the Inquisitors, allowing them to measure themselves against other Inquisitors, and come out feeling superior. As there are so many labels and factions, it also allows an Inquisitor to evolve their ideas and positions and methods, whilst still being able to say that they fall within the recognised limits of the Inquisiton as a whole.
They might also be a fig-leaf of acceptance; by putting on a show of following particular beliefs, they can persuade other Inquisitors to work with them who mightn't do so normally. Aren't all Inquisitors great actors in the end? Well, at least the good/flexible ones.

GFP
 

·
description whore
Joined
·
2,864 Posts
The real point of Eisenhorn, to me, is to show how easy the change from puritan to radical is, how easy it is to cross the line and morph into something you never wanted to be.

eisenhorn is most definitely radical, in ravenor his only associate is a daemon host and he accepts it is a situation he never expected. However there is no doubt he is staunchly imperial, he has merely been forced to expand his horizons and use other methods. Particularly as he cannot destroy cherubael only imprison it and use it at his command... i mean with the titan he had no choice, die or use the daemon host.

His death would have accomplished nothing, though im certain many a staunchly puritan inquisitor would have died
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,976 Posts
To paraphrase (because I can`t quote from memory):

I believe radicalism is inevitable. The more we learn about our foe, the more we realize the steps we must take to combat them.

That basically says it all. As we, the readers, know, the puritan approach can only succed up to a certain point. After that, you pretty much have to take a bit of a dive, and hope you have the strength of will to remember your true loyalties.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top