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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been playing a bunch of Space Hulk of recently and have assembled a whole batch of new genestealers for it. I have been looking for a quick way to get them painted and stumbled upon dipping. I have found a good tutorial here but was wondering what success (or failure) folks here have had?

Also for the UK based heretics is there a wood stain product they would recommend for dipping?
 

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I have had some good success dipping my kroot but like any technique we use dipping take practice to get just right though it is easy and yields very nice results :)
 

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Porn King!!!
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It depends on the stain you get but dipping works very well. Mainly for organic looking models though.
 

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I would just go for spray painting them lol A lot less chance of gettin too much paint on them..
 

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Ah, wait! You guys meaning like dipping in ink? Not paint? lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys, I found a product recommendation on dystartes.com so i'll give it a go.
 

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For the benefit of Aslomov and anyone else unfamiliar with dipping...

Dipping is NOT plunking a model into the paint pot. Dipping is an assembly-line technique that was popularized by Undead players who could crank out hundreds of skeletons in a day using the technique.

Basically, what you do is get some wood stain... lighter colors work better than dark ones, in my experience, since you can always do a second dip for a darker stain. Prime the model white, and mix up the wood stain with water. The stuff already has the consistency of ink, but since we're submerging a model in it, it's good to be a little cautious with how much gets put on. Then, dip. Might want some rubber gloves or something for the exercise, since the stuff STAINS like a motherf*cker. Once it dries, break out the tank brush and a pot of a mix of bleached bone and skull white, and go to town drybrushing the skeletons. From there, all you need to do is paint the weapon and shield, which is quite quick.

You can get a similar effect if you can find a suitably thin paint in large quantity, so you could then conceivably get a purple stain or a green stain or whatever. Just keep in mind that this doesn't work over black undercoats, nor does it work particularly well over grey-- you really need white primer to do it. Admittedly, it's one of the few things white primer is good for nowadays with the Foundation Range out.
 

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I know 'cause you guys are on about wood stain. So of course your no on about dipping it in paint lol..
 

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Shawn Gately in his own words (copied from waryammer.com)

GATELY'S GOOP

About a year and a half ago I ran out of spray primer while painting my Space Wolves. Although I normally prime in white, I needed this particular model to be primed black. So, I mixed some clear paint-on primer (from a local craft shop) with black paint and slathered it on. I was disappointed when it came out a glossy gray color. That is, until it dried...

I call this priming method "gray scaling" since it produces a model ready to paint that is perfectly grayscaled, like a black and white photograph.

Gately's Goop
Mix 60 parts Sealer (Delta-Ceramcoat Sealer found at most craft shops) with 1 part black paint. Do not water the mix down; it reduces the properties of the sealer. Also, if you find that the mix is drying in the palette while you are using it, mix up a fresh batch. Once it begins to gel up the stuff is useless.

How to Grayscale
1) Prime your model white. Do not worry about getting every crevasse. Prime lightly, if there is metal or plastic showing through in the deep areas this will be covered up.

2) Slather on the Goop starting at the top of the model. Spread evenly and be careful to not let the thick goop accumulate too thickly in the recesses. You may have to dry your brush and "suck" the excess off.

3) Wait for the Goop to dry. As it dries, the sealer will push the paint particles into the deep areas. When it is wet it will look awful. Have faith in the process. In the end you should have a perfectly grayscaled model.

Other Techniques and applications
1) Supa Fast Orks: a) Prime white. b) Paint all flesh areas goblin green. Don't worry about not getting it in every crevasse, or slopping, as this will get covered later. c) Apply the Goop and allow to dry. d) Drybrush metal areas. e) Put a little sealer into some brown ink and slather this over leather areas. You can alter the mix for different shades (adding yellow, chestnut and flesh washes).

2) I tried this on some bare metal Eldar replacing black paint with blue paint and ink in the Gately's Goop recipe. The end result was a shaded metallic blue.

3) For perfect wood slather the following mix over the dry grayscale: 20 parts sealer, 1 part water, 1 part brown paint, and 1 part ink (yellow, chestnut, or flesh works).

4) For a second shaded layer try mixing up the Goop with colored paint or ink. Sealer:green paint:blue ink worked very well with my Lizardmen. This technique would work very well with Tyranids, I
think.

5) If you add a little bit of sealer to ink it gives some body and helps it go on more uniformly.

6) The Goop does not work well on vehicles! When spread over large areas it becomes mottled. I haven't found a way to circumvent this. I just use it on the detail areas of a vehicle.

I hope that helps. I've painted up numerous armies in record time using this technique. If you pass on this recipe, please include my name so I can become famous and wealthy.

Shawn Gately
 

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Awww, thats really cool path but I just wish i could see exactly what is happening in the process. I'm a bit confuddled. :lol:

Have you done it path?
 

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Porn King!!!
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Here is a Kroot I tried it on. Picture is really awful actually so it does look much better in person. Took about 30 mins from basecoating to do.

 

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Nope, never tried it. I paint traditionally because I am a perfectionist.
 
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