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Krauthead
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101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello folks!

It's been a while since my last post, pretty much 2 years to be precise.
Kids, work and other habits kept me away from painting. Luckily the desire for miniature painting returned so I just had to figure out what project to start next. Before I quitted I got my hands on a forgeworld brass scorpion which missed some minor parts for the tail claw - that big chunk of resin just yelled to get painted - so why start small if you could start big!?

After browsing the Internet for insprational pictures I recognized that all of the paintjobs were pretty clean and shiny, especially the one shown on the forgeworld site. For me Chaos is dirty, rusty and battleworn so I decided to approach that model from a different perspective.

Cleaning the mold lines and resin fail casts took me at least 5 hours. On the other hand pre assembling the miniature went flawlessly, there is even the option to keep the legs and main claws movable after painting - top casting tolerance!

After priming with skull white I airbrushed different browns and reds for the rusty base coat. I then decided to test my painting scheme on one lonely armor plate:


Rusty base coat with hairspray and salt!


Vallejo Air Ferrari Red


Vallejo Air Light Red


Vallejo Air Mahagoni Brown


Final coat of Vallejo Air Ferrari Red


Cleaned armor plate, rusty edge highlight and first base coat for the NMM gold


Hooray, it works! More or less...



First test fit

The transitions could be smoother and the highlights could be sharper but all in all it was a quite satisfying test run! Next in the queue are the other upper armor plates.

PS: Sorry for my wobbly english, I have to get used to it again! ;)
 

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Premium Member
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6,385 Posts
Even though I'm looking at the pictures, I don't quite understand how this works. What exactly happens between screen 5 and 6?
You basically rub the salt off, which removes the paint you sprayed over it. It's a way of masking to create a more natural rusting look than you'd get if you'd liquid masked or used tape.

I've seen it also used (with an airbrush) to create a digital camo pattern by doing multiple layers of color and of the salt, each building over the other and then rubbing it all off to create the effect.
 

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Krauthead
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101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow! I've never realised that thing was so huge!
I think you test plate looks great. The only thing is that I feel the rust is somewhat to symetrical.
Thanks! Yeah, kinda funny that this happened with that technique. The main problem is that the top layer paint wasn't totally dried out. The result is that a lot more paint was removed than predicted.

Non-metallic Metal and the Salt Weathering technique? Ambitious for your second try. I take it you have a fair amount of practice before this.
I look forward to seeing the final product.
This seems to be a little misunderstanding. I painted miniatures for around 4-5 years before my break so there is a bit of experience at hand. The NMM gold is the "only" new technique that I approach. Sadly I deleted most pictures from my webserver that were linked here on HO. Some old paint jobs can be found here tho: http://www.coolminiornot.com/browse/browseid/8776936

You basically rub the salt off, which removes the paint you sprayed over it. It's a way of masking to create a more natural rusting look than you'd get if you'd liquid masked or used tape.
I've seen it also used (with an airbrush) to create a digital camo pattern by doing multiple layers of color and of the salt, each building over the other and then rubbing it all off to create the effect.
Close. Since the airbrush paint layer is so thin I wouldn't recommend rubbing it off. It happens quite a lot that you "break" the paint layer and hit the primer layer. I usually remove it with very warm water and a brush.

Looking good already, can't wait to see this progress.
Tyty!

Yea holy crap. It is a sick model!
I never ever had a more massive chunk of resin in my hands before. The main body is one single piece of resin and could easily be used as a lethal close combat weapon!
 

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Herald of The Warp
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2,752 Posts
Close. Since the airbrush paint layer is so thin I wouldn't recommend rubbing it off. It happens quite a lot that you "break" the paint layer and hit the primer layer. I usually remove it with very warm water and a brush.
Ah allrighty - After this is all done, a technique like this would be an excellent addition to this forums tutorials. If you're up for it :D
 
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