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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings from your friendly neighborhood Autarch!

Admit it. The one thing you despise about GW/Citadel is the (over)price. And unless you are stinkin' rich, you don't mind finding cheaper alternatives to your paint and modeling gear and materials.

Here are some tips that you might find useful:

1. Modeling and painting surface. Next time you swing by your local dollar store, look through the kitchen ware. Somewhere amid the spatulas you'll probably find a little hard plastic cutting board. The cutting board is an obvious surface to place your sprues for cutting and sniping. It's also a steady surface where you can place your pieces for gluing. And, I like to flip mine over for a secure, waterproof painting surface. The cutting board is hardy, resistance to whatever you do on it, small and portable, and cheap.

2. Paint palette. I've seen people use their thumbnails and/or a fancy professional paint palette for mixing and thinning paints. I don't like either of those so... broken tile. My wife and I built our house about 10 years ago, and for some reason I stuck back a box of tiles used in our kitchen. When I got serious about miniature painting, I happened to think about this box of tile and pulled out a broken piece. It works great. Ceramic tile is obviously waterproof, thick, and resilient and heavy for a table top (so it won't move on you and splatter paint on your dining room table). A five by five inch piece should give you a great surface for your colors. Check your garage or dump or wherever a broken tile might lie, and you have a practically free 'expert' palette.

3. Water container. Sometimes you need just a little water for mixing into your paints, other times you need a lot for washing out brushes. Whatever the need, a plastic drinking cup, cut to size, should be all you need. My go-to container is a red plastic Solo-brand drinking cup, sliced around the base about a half inch up.

4. Glue. I don't have any Citadel glue for comparison on price or quality, but my 40k friends and I have much success with Loctite's SuperGlue Control Gel. Get the Gel. It cures what ails you. :good:

5. Paints. I know this is a touchy subject for some people, and I too use the GW paints for the minis, but when it comes to bases, scenes, terrain, etc, the cheap craft store acrylic paint is the same stuff. You get 5 times the black and white and grey paint in easy to use tubes for the price of a little thumb-sized cup of the GW stuff. The ash wasteland terrain you've been dying to make could be yours for pennies on the GW dollar.

6. Spare parts containers. Tupperware... seems simple enough, but really I'm not sure everyone has thought to just pull out some of the old well-worn plasticware out of the cabinet for holding the little bits. And tupperware now comes in all sizes and shapes imaginable. And Gladeware makes a very cheap disposable version for snacks and sandwiches and ketchup... And if you want to go even cheaper? Blister packs! The packaging used to sell the stuff is also just fine for storing it as well. I know my Dark Reaper purchase came with a nice multi-bubbled plastic container that snaps back together.

7. Terrain building material. A Cardboard box can do wonders. I am infinitely amazed at how many types of terrain, whether ruins or natural scenes can be built out of a shipping box. So far, I've been able to make any type of terrain my imagination can muster. Granted, I might be a little more 'crafty' than the average Warhammer Gamer, but I think you'll be pleased with the cheap alternative building material of good ol' cardboard.

8. Static grass, etc. I don't know about you, but one of the most overpriced things in the Citadel section of the hobby store is the little tub of static grass. And don't get me started on the eight dollar tub of sand. SAND! Sand is, well, sand! If you have to buy it, look at the toy department for a bag of child's play sand. Same stuff, larger quantity, much cheaper. Anyway, back to static grass. I was meandering through Hobby Lobby (our premier craft store) with my 4 year old son. He loves trains, so I took him to the model train section. We were only looking, mind you, since the model sets are 200 dollars or more a piece. And, low and behold, the same trees, static grass, sand, gravel, rock-face molds, even spray paint that GW sells was much cheaper and in larger quantities. 4 times the static grass for 3 dollars more I think is a great deal. And quality? Do you know how obsessed the model train people are? If it's good enough for them...


If you were able to take just one tip from this and make it work for you, or even gained a little inspiration for your own cheaper alternative from this, I've done my job. Hope you liked it.

-Decimus
 
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wow great ideas dude u rock thx for the ideas :goodpost::goodpost:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, thanks, muddy. I was hoping someone would benefit from this list.

Good luck and have fun out there in WH land!
 

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Thanks for the guide! +rep!

Though ziploc bags work just fine for storing bits. Really need a big one? Just get some gallon-size.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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You know what makes good rock basing material? Rocks. Seriously.
Go outside, pick up some rocks and there you go, you got rocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm glad you found something here that helped you. Now, can someone find me a few hours to play a Warhammer game, eh? :( :p
 

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A comment Tip No8.
If you go to the beach, take a ice cream container with you and fill it up with sand, and other things wich wont look out of place on your models.
 

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A comment Tip No8.
If you go to the beach, take a ice cream container with you and fill it up with sand, and other things wich wont look out of place on your models.
Plus, if anyone asks you what you're doing, you can say:

"I'm taking the sand home! For my Army!"

Thus giving them a wonderful story about a seemingly crazy stranger which they can regale their friends with later on.
 

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A comment Tip No8.
If you go to the beach, take a ice cream container with you and fill it up with sand, and other things wich wont look out of place on your models.
If you do this it is a good idea to wash the bits before you use them; or even bleach them. This will aid gluing and stop any nasty reactions between paint/glue and whatever is floating around your coast.

Also, watch out for hermit crabs; my grandmother ended up with one loose in her pocket after beach-combing.
 

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lol, ah i had never thought of bleaching before
 

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MAGNETS

Hey, I was wondering if anybody has advice on using magnets. I want to start putting smaller and larger models together with magnets but don't really know what kind to buy.

I dont want to break the bank and at the same time I dont to buy something that is just going to be pants...

any tips would be gratefuly recieved!

Thanks,
Toby
 

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i have no idea but i think i saw a tutorial for it just search magnets or go to modeling tutorials. whatever works. BTW i advise only using them for seargants/characters/vehicles/other important people not standard soldiers its a waste. It gets way too expensive. Good luck, and check out my army
 

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I am working a tutorial for it now but in a nut shell you want to look for "rare earth magnets". The most common type for vehicles are the 1/8" while infantry models use 1/16".

Once you are looking at the mangets getting ready to buy them you will see a number that is preceded by an N, like N35, N40, N52, etc. Those are the different stengths, the highest strength you can get is an N52 magnet. For general use I find that a N40 is normally good.
 

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If it helps, these are what I've found out (for England, no experience about anywhere else):

Sand:
I'm not going 'Eco-Warrior', but I'd really not recommend taking sand off beaches: I'm not saying people get sued, but with things like coastal erosion, etc, some beaches are now protected sites and/or habitats for rare or endangered species of animals (and you won't always know which ones are which, because they're not usually signposted or advertised). Instead, kids' playsand, building sand, etc, is really cheap for vast amounts of the stuff and you'll be keeping the beaches safe for the sea- and sand- creatures which rely on it to live in and on.

Slates:
Check out local high street hardware and homeware stores who sell stuff for gardens (usually the same people who sell kids playsand); in Spring and Summer, I've found kilo's of slate on sale in these places for about £3-£5. Even if (likely) you can't use it all yourself, get a few other gamers/modellers together, contribute a quid or so each and share a bag between you.

Needle files + hobby vices:
I'm not necessarily saying they're the cheapest but, if you're looking at high street retailers for tools, check out the places that sell power tools; they tend to also sell needle files, side-cutters and hobby vices for cheaper (and they will also last longer, as they're intended for more heavy-duty/industrial scale usage than just a bit of hobbying). They might also have good deals on airbrushes and compressors (but you need to make sure you know what features you want it to have, as the ones in store might not be 100% what you want for your hobby needs).

Cabling:
Are you or anyone you know replacing your old IT and/or audio-visual equipment (i.e. destroying the old stuff instead of part-exchanging or selling it)? Modern gadgets can have yards of useful wiring in them. If you can pull the wire out of the plastic/rubber cabling with tweezers/side clippers (should be easy enough) you can make use of this as well. Circuit boards are great to use for the insides of vehicles and industrial-type scenery and you can strip the various chips and bits off them to use on vehicles, cyborgs, mutants, Mechanicus, etc, projects. (I'm not not technically-minded, so I don't know the names of these parts however).

People might already know all of this anyway, but just trying to contribute and help.
AndyG.
 

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I found a porcelian egg plate at Target for 3.99 that makes an "egg"celent paint palette. The Citadel one is about 0.96 more and plastic.



Lol. And don't boo me out for the corny joke.
 

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- save plastic bottlecaps to mount infantry models on with blu-tac for handling while painting.

- our local IKEA sells aquarium sand for less than half of games workshop's modelling sand. it's about the same grain size.

- for modelling wheat, old broom bristles can be pretty realistic.
 
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