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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I've recently gotten back into painting my old 40k minis from about 10 years ago when I played (I never did very well....I had a total of 4 colours!), and i'm having a ball, but im having trouble with painting light areas on a dark basecoat, as the model ends up looking 'bumpy', as in if you look at the model from 10-15 cms away there are noticeable raised areas.

I've tried thinning the paint down and doing multiple coats, but it still seems to do this - any ideas on what I can try? :(

For reference here are 2 of the models i've painted recently where i've run into this problem (heads on both of the models):

front
back
Sort of on the side

I just realised that the pics are a bit dodgy, i'll try to take better ones to upload.

On an unrelated note, the striking scorp models look kickass now!
 

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Question--

Did you use primer?

Also--Even though the pics are not the greatest ever..The paint doesnt seem "bumpy."

Glad you are havign fun though! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Anphicar said:
Question--

Did you use primer?

Also--Even though the pics are not the greatest ever..The paint doesnt seem "bumpy."
Probably a stupid question, but what exactly do you mean by primer? Im using chaos black spray as a base, then usually painting over that with the primary colour for the model (e.g. dark angels green for the scorp). I realise my terminology may be bad ;)

And yeah, part of why I said the pictures are dodgy is because the bumpiness doesnt seem to be showing up in them :(
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Anphicar said:
Yep, thats a primer.

Another question: How long do you wait between layers?
usually 5-10 mins (or a couple of hours) depending on how impatient I am....
 

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Thats a big thing, and it was my problem too.

You must wait a minimum of ...45 minutes, and hour being the best.

It is crucial. If you dont allow enough time to dry, when you go to paint the next layer, bits and small pieces "rise up" from the old layer like plaster, giving a bumpy look.

Hope that helps. And be patient! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Anphicar said:
Thats a big thing, and it was my problem too.

You must wait a minimum of ...45 minutes, and hour being the best.

It is crucial. If you dont allow enough time to dry, when you go to paint the next layer, bits and small pieces "rise up" from the old layer like plaster, giving a bumpy look.

Hope that helps. And be patient! :D
Oh god an hour between coats D:

I'll give that a shot on my next model, cheers for the advice :)
 

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hmm, I've never had to wait more than 5 minutes between coats, however I usually am drybrushing thickly, or damp brushing my main color over a darker base color.
 

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i'll throw my two cents in, the problem might arise if youre using the paint straight out of the pot. if youre using a palette though, i cant imagine how these lumps are forming. ive heard that temperature extremes can affect paint consistency...
 

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Agreed are you thinning your paints? If not I know that can cause some lumpiness form time to time or as well as not shaking your paint up go enough.

As for thinning paints a 50/50 mix of Future floor wax and water in your paints works quite nicely Thin paints cover better and dry faster than thicker paints.

Also if your paints are old and have that dried caked paint in the pot that can cause lumps as well
 
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