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Thread: How to pin metal models? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-12-16 06:07 PM
morfangdakka @Kreuger Yeah I had pinned the head and arm on a space marine captain so of course I was ready to tackle this monster model. Ah youth and over confidence. I think it took me like 2 weeks to pin and get this put together but almost 20 years later and 4 moves it is still together even after my daughter knocked it off a shelf.
06-11-16 06:14 AM
Kreuger @morfangdakka wow, that's a pretty serious model for a "pewter beginner." I was young when I made mine, but I had already made a bunch of smaller metal models.
06-11-16 06:02 AM
morfangdakka
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreuger View Post

I had to do that in the original chaos dragon model, Baudros. If you look in the lower left of the image there is a join between the lower body and upper body with very little support.



Here's the full model.



As you can see there's a LOT of pewter above that join.
Yeah this was the second metal model I put together and it was my introduction into pinning. I spent a lot time pinning that model.
06-09-16 03:53 PM
Kreuger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loki1416 View Post
Little while ago I got into a Battletech kick so purchased a bunch of models. All metal. Decided that this time (unlike when I was 10) that I was going to pin them. Unlike a plastic model where I made the pin "straight", meaning that I drilled straight into the arm and straight into the body, I decided to try a new method for the metal. For the arm I did an angle up (looked like this: \) and on the body I did an angle down (looked like this:\). That way, because gravity is pulling the arm down, it's pulling it constantly down onto the pin and constantly pushing the pin down in the body cavity. Has worked well for me. Did some playing with them, painting, and even a packing and move, and no broken pieces. Just my two cents and an alternate way of doing it.
Great point. I've done similar things. Definitely consider how the model will be handled and how gravity will affect it.

With some larger models it's sometimes necessary to use more than 1 pin as well.

I had to do that in the original chaos dragon model, Baudros. If you look in the lower left of the image there is a join between the lower body and upper body with very little support.



Here's the full model.



As you can see there's a LOT of pewter above that join.
06-09-16 03:41 PM
Moriouce Thanks everyone! This has been most helpful!! [emoji106]
06-09-16 03:35 PM
DaisyDuke This is what I use but there are cheaper ones
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I've drilled stone metal and plastic and had no issues
And as ntaw said just use superglue and paper clip
06-09-16 05:12 AM
Loki1416 Little while ago I got into a Battletech kick so purchased a bunch of models. All metal. Decided that this time (unlike when I was 10) that I was going to pin them. Unlike a plastic model where I made the pin "straight", meaning that I drilled straight into the arm and straight into the body, I decided to try a new method for the metal. For the arm I did an angle up (looked like this: \) and on the body I did an angle down (looked like this:\). That way, because gravity is pulling the arm down, it's pulling it constantly down onto the pin and constantly pushing the pin down in the body cavity. Has worked well for me. Did some playing with them, painting, and even a packing and move, and no broken pieces. Just my two cents and an alternate way of doing it.
06-09-16 04:12 AM
Kreuger Another great tip is to paint one entire side of the join and press them together. If you need to find a door for the hole OR if you need to check how smoothly the halves come together.

Using paint this way instantly colors the raised areas which need to be sanded down.
06-09-16 03:52 AM
morfangdakka
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreuger View Post
Here's another example I like better because it has a swivel head which allows you to use a lot more force without hurting your hands.
The swivel head is a much better drill to use. It is best to drill into one piece glue in a small piece of metal paper clip and glue it in. Now you can put a little black paint on the end of it to mark the other side so you know where to drill the second hole. Once that is done add some glue to the other hole and a small amount of green stuff will make the joint even stronger once it dries.
06-08-16 06:53 PM
Kreuger The drill is actually called a "pin vise." That links to an amazon page with an example.

Here's another example I like better because it has a swivel head which allows you to use a lot more force without hurting your hands.
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