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post #96 of (permalink) Old 08-12-17, 11:10 PM
Shandathe
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Originally Posted by Blackadder View Post
Here's a question for all you painting buffs and I've yet to find it satisfactorily explained.

In the video below the author begins at the 2:20 two minute 20 second mark to "Shade" the the model with 3 parts Vallejo brown ink and 1 part Vallejo Black ink Now I've got dozens of bottles of shades, washes, glazes and nuln oil (Also a Shade and what I am most use to using with adequate results...........)

What I want to know is since the author is indiscriminately using the words "Shade," "Wash," "ink," interchangeably; what is he on about and what could be substituted for this so called "Ink" mix.

I'm sure a lot of tyros such as myself would like a succinct explanation.

Here's your chance to shine and have the Blackadder in your debt.:D
Okay, lemme take a stab at it.

Inks are effectively your basic coloring agent. They're... well, inks. They're intensely colored, translucent, and (usually) dry glossy.

When painting minis, washing - "Shade" being the new term for "Wash", these are the same - and glazing are the two main uses for them, and GW offers premixed formulas that contain additives to aid in those uses.

Glazes are like somewhat dilute inks with a glazing acrylic medium thrown in, applied generally to evenly tint a surface, changing the hue of underlying paint or increasing color saturation. Usually used for vibrancy. NB: Mixing an ink with some Lahmian Medium gets you something akin to a Glaze, which can give you vibrant and interesting results.

Washes contain another acrylic medium and a surface active agent (surfactant), which causes them to pool more deeply in recesses, resulting in a shading effect (due to the higher volume of pigment deposited).


To get about the same result for shading as in the video you linked, just use the GW shades (Mix as required. It's unlikely he'll be using an ink to shade in a color that GW doesn't offer as one. You can add a bit of water to lighten things if needed). The additives mean you'll actually have an easier time controlling where the color goes than he does


EDIT: Whoops, ninjad by Old Man78...

Ask not the Eldar a question, for they will give you three answers; all of which are true and horrifying to know.

Last edited by Shandathe; 08-12-17 at 11:17 PM.
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